AngryFrenchGuy

Immigrant’s Son from Montreal’s West Island Claims to Be FLQ and Drops a Bomb

with 51 comments

So,  imagine you’re a twenty-something son of immigrants living in Montreal’s English-speaking and federalist bastion of DDO, a prolific hiphop artist who drops online EPs and mixtapes with a frequency that can’t be healthy, and who’s first full-length English-language album had both the Hour and the Mirror, Montreal’s English-language alt-weeklies, hyping you as one of the best upcoming local MC’s, able to combine « standard braggadocio with some intelligent introspection ».

What’s your next move?

Why, a double French-language LP and a single titled FLQ in which you give shout outs to Québec sovereigntists René Lévesque and Pierre Falardeau and spit: « Yes, I’m Québécois. No, I don’t know Canada. », of course…

Karma Atchykah drops a bomb.

You’re throwing around a lot of very charged imagery on your first single: the FLQ, giving props to René Lévesque and Pierre Falardeau. Coming from an immigrant…   from the West Island…  who is known  for rapping in English…   that confuses a lot of people who aren’t sure what you mean. Why don’t you tell me what you want to say with that song.

With that song I’m just trying to rally as much people as I can.  To be in Montreal, to be a Quebecer, to me, means a whole lot more, especially in 2010, you know?   I was born in the 80’s, grew up in the 90’s,  I’ve been in Montreal for 28 years of my life.  It really got diverse and I felt there was a need that we redefine what it means to be a Quebecer for these times.   And I feel that FLQ was about Quebecer pride, but at the same time had shock value.  That was the effect.

What was the reaction from Anglos, from your friends who know you from the Anglo scene?

[Laughs] The Anglos, I would have to say, focus much more on the vibe of the song, on the beat itself, the more the technical, musical stuff. And they definitely feel it’s a cool song. I don’t have any people who are… against the song, in that sort of way. Like, an Anglo station maybe might feel the FLQ reference was not something to joke about or this and that, but I really don’t have that kind of feedback going about. People definitely see that the song has that type of energy. Maybe it’s due to the fact I do music in both languages. Even though people have prejudice towards French music and say they don’t listen to French music, they’ll listen to my music and say « I don’t generally listen to French music, but I like your stuff. »

What about the other side? I was reading the comments on YouTube, and some people had retarded opinions and wrote stuff like: « It’s cool that one of our guests is representing Québec », as if you weren’t really Québécois. Do you get some of that?

I get a bit of « he’s not really Quebecer » and this and that. But what am I? I was born here, I’ve lived and worked here all my life. No matter how deeply involved I am with my origins, doesn’t change that my birthplace is still here. This is what I wanted to do with the song. It’s cool to be catchy, this and that, but you also want to have a discussion such as this. And it sparked that discussion. If you want to go down to the basics it’s really quite simple: no one is really at home here, no matter how many centuries you’ve been here, you know. I guess technically the natives are the only ones who can really claim that they were here before everybody, but even then, it’s what you do with your life that’s going to matter at the end of the day.

You have to admit, the Québécois are always a little bit insecure. A few of prominent artists have complained in the past that it’s badly seen in the Québec cultural community not to be a nationalist. Is this just your way of making friends in the industry?

I felt the need to demonstrate Québec pride for several reasons. One reason actually being the fact that this is my first French album, so I really wanted to make a strong point. I’ve always had the problem of people not necessarily knowing where I’m from. Especially the English music followers thought maybe…   Ontario, or people maybe thought I’m form some part of the States and a lot of people would not know that I’m from Québec and Montreal. To me it felt right. A lot of the calculation was about what needs to be represented to make a distinct sense of this guy is from here, he’s repping here and he’s not trying to be from somewhere else. That might just be in the case of Québec, that you have to show Québec love if you want them to sense that, oh yeah, this guy’s from here.

But now you know that because you’ve rapped: « Oui, j’suis Québécois. Non, j’connais pas le Canada » [Yes, I’m Québécois. No, I don’t know Canada.], you can’t accept Canada Day gigs anymore.

If you ask me where I’m from, I’ll tell you Québec first. And that’s not a lie, not a front I’m putting up. When I was kid growing up, René Lévesque and people like that were still fresh in people’s minds and the sense of nationalism was very strong. The sense of Québec outside of Canada was very strong in my mind. As a kid growing up I wasn’t actually understanding that Québec was actually part of Canada. People talked about Québec so strongly I thought, Ok, this might be a country. I’ve always had a sense of me being part of Québec, even though I only knew Montreal. Would I refuse Canada Day? Well I guess it would be a little bit weird for me to do it, but it also depends when in my life I get to it. And I’ll still rep Québec before I rep Canada, regardless. I’m not gonna be doing Canada Day this year, that’s for damn sure, though!

You’re about 10 years younger than me. I went to a very multiethnic school in NDG where white Québec-born kids like me were a very small minority. I feel, maybe in Montreal, there’s a new generation who define identity differently. It’s not the federalist dream of a fully bilingual, bicultural Canadian nation or the old school Québécois image that some nationalists would like us to be. There is a feeling of else coming together. Do you feel that?

Definitely so. I could definitely say that for Montreal, for sure. In the rest of Québec it might be a little less diverse… and even that’s becoming more mixed.

Yeah, Québec City…

Québec City is definitely there too, but there are smaller towns, towns that are way more francophone, that are getting more diverse. Whatever it is, let it be. Whether it stays more homogeneous or it gets more diverse, I don’t really care,  That’s just the natural course of things. I think it’s a cool thing, but there’s got to be an openness. There’s just got to be an openess.

How do you feel the majority in Québec is reacting to minorities? To the Immigration generation, let’s call it that?  I wrote recently on how what you see on Québec TV looks nothing like what you see on the Metro. There’s something wrong, don’t you think?

I feel… it comes from both sides. If you’re the person that feels misrepresented, you still have to step it up a notch. If you want something to change, you’re better off trying to change it yourself. Perfect yourself. Be in their face, to the extent that they can’t really deny you at that point, you know what I mean? Is it fair, is it not? That’s a different question right there. But you have to do your part in order to have people notice you.

From my very first video, the 3-in-1, I got a response quicker than I expected, but on the other hand, I had made a conscious effort of making sure this thing made me proud and represented the people and got the diversity of me and my sound out there. That type of move is an example of how you get that diversity out up front.

Lots of political talk on my blog, so do you have any thought about politics you want to share? Sovereignty, independence, do you have anything to say about that? Does it matter anymore?

I don’t even know anymore if it matters. I think Québec as a culture, in Canada, is and alway will be something distinct, and you see it in the entertainment business. That’s my personal point of view, and I might be biased. I know people in Ontario might have a different perspective, but Canadian identity is a little harder to distinguish than Quebecer identity from the American and other influences. This is something Quebecers, in the present moment, have to be proud about.  And keep that pride alive.

The question of an independent country really has to do with economics. If you don’t have a strong leader, to convince people about things, I don’t think Québec will ever be ready. I think one of the strongest ones was René Lévesque, ’cause he could even get an immigrant to feel concerned. I think if René Lévesque was still alive he would be convincing more people now. But who’s in the movement right now? You have to keep in mind some of the people who sort of wrecked things, like Parizeau being a sore loser… There’s some major faux-pas that were done. I’m not against it, but I’m not particularly for it, in the situation that we’re in today.

Check out karmaatchykah.com or get one of his MANY free English and French street albums on Diasporama.tv


Written by angryfrenchguy

March 3, 2010 at 7:18 pm

Posted in The Interviews

51 Responses

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  1. a bright kid – live direct from montreal.

    thank you for that – agf.

    johnnyonline

    March 3, 2010 at 9:08 pm

  2. Karma Atchykah says:

    You have to keep in mind some of the people who sort of wrecked things, like Parizeau being a sore loser

    The link provided in AFG’s interview goes to a video of Parizeau’s famous “money and the ethnic vote” comment on referendum night. Everyone — including many, many separatists — denounced Parizeau for saying it. It is believed by many that Parizeau’s resignation soon afterwards was a direct effect from those comments.

    I have always believed that to be absurd and extremely unfair to Parizeau. He was not only stating the obvious but he was fully justified in saying what he did.

    But referendum night wasn’t the first time Parizeau got into hot water for making such a comment. He also made similar remarks two years prior, in January of 1993. At the time everyone also rained criticism on him.

    I defended him.

    Here is my opinion piece on the subject which The Gazette published at the time:

    http://docs.google.com/View?docid=dg6n6657_173fb5ps2tn

    After his “money and the ethnic vote” comment on referendum night, I submitted another opinion piece to The Gazette defending Parizeau but they didn’t publish it.

    But in my book, in chapter 9, I defend his referendum night comments quite strongly:

    http://whycanadamustend.com/Chapter%209.htm

    Tony Kondaks

    March 4, 2010 at 1:40 am

  3. “And I feel that FLQ was about Quebecer pride, but at the same time had shock value. That was the effect.”

    Yes, there was certainly some ‘shock value’. Wasnt until 1983 that my mother agreed that we no longer had to travel from NB to Ontario through New England and New York. :P

    John

    March 4, 2010 at 7:58 am

  4. That is a fascinating insight John. A few bad apples (amplified by whole lot of members of the media) can turn an embarrassing isolated event into true widespread terror.

    These days when my family travels outside Canada we intentionally avoid passing through US airports because of the attitudes and activities of US Customs and Immigration officials.

    I don’t believe these few individuals represent the real USA or its citizens but they do hold the mandate of law for the 5 terrible minutes that you are within their grasps. It is state-sponsored terror.

    Tony, Don’t you think that Parizeau’s error was not is stating the facts, but in dismissing their significance. He essentially said that if the French population of Quebec tried just a bit harder they could neutralize the unhappy influence of these “outsiders”.

    edward

    March 4, 2010 at 8:29 am

  5. Young men like Karma Atchykah show why Parizeau was so wrong. Quebec cannot be us vs. them. It should be “nous ensemble”.

    edward

    March 4, 2010 at 8:39 am

  6. My poor mother. We lived in Eastern Ontario for a short time in the early 80s. She’d near take a heart attack when dad’d take me to Montreal to see Habs games.

    Times have changed and she has changed as well. My sister was offered a teaching job in Montreal a few years ago and her first reaction was that my sis could improve her French in a beautiful city. And me personally, I’ve been to and through Quebec maybe a 100 or so times in my life. A few minor incidents, but I’d never let the ‘bad apples’ cloud my judgment. One arsehole yelling at me on a bus doesn’t equal 7 million yelling bus riders. ;)

    John

    March 4, 2010 at 9:23 am

  7. i don’t really see why people make such a big deal about non-francophones who speak French well as being a true Québécois or not. I know a guy here who told me about some person in Québec City, an anglophone who spoke a very good French but still had some accent and that he was born and spent his whole life there and was not accepted as a Québécois completely.

    Well, I would like to know which society does accept someone else as one of their own who has an accent or is not of the majority? In Minnesota, it doesn’t matter if a person was born there, but if they still speak with, let’s say a Spanish/Mexican accent, somewhat, I am sure most people wouldn’t think: ‘oh, that’s a real minnesota person!’ I think this is true everywhere. Yeah, sure, this person is Minnesotan, but not the same way that I would be considered to be Minnesotan in the eyes of others.

    So, if francophones are the majority in Québec, it only makes sense that someone who speaks French as a second language would not be considered completely québécois. Maybe their children or grandchildren, if those kids transitioned to French . . .Call it élitism if you want, but then I guess every place in the world is élitist.

    No matter how good my French is, I wouldn’t ever expect to be considered Québécois. Even if I were born here. Now, if you want to define québec as bi-cultural and bilingual, then yeah, sure, I suppose maybe that could work, but who does that? When people snarl the word ‘québécois’ are they really talking about most of the citizens of Dorval or French speakers?

    I am not talking about skin color, I am talking about accents. Do you really think people in Manitoba are going to think some person who has spent their whole life somewhere, but speaks with an accent would be truly looked upon as someone just the same as them?

    But in Québec, it’s different, I suppose. Here they’re racist, since everyone likes to turn a language thing into a race thing.

    Thomas Dean Nordlum

    March 4, 2010 at 2:45 pm

  8. The reality is that the anglophone community of Quebec welcomed every ethnic group into its schools and community for years…until Bill 22 and Bill 101. Indeed, it was the anglo community’s ability to integrate new comers so easily and completely that pissed on the nationalists whose community, of course, rejected the new comers as “les autres” for years.

    Tony Kondaks

    March 4, 2010 at 5:32 pm

  9. “i don’t really see why people make such a big deal about non-francophones who speak French well as being a true Québécois or not.”

    Well, it might not be a big deal for you, but it might be for people who do not have a place where they are accepted as one of the “natives”. You are accepted as one where you were born (Minnesota I assume), so you do have that sense of belonging to one place. A visible minority born in Canada might not be accepted as a true Canadian, but he will also most likely not be accepted as a true native in the country of his parents/ancestors. And just because this happens across the world, does not mean that for the people concerned it is not a big deal.

    “But in Québec, it’s different, I suppose. Here they’re racist, since everyone likes to turn a language thing into a race thing.”

    Who said that it’s different here in Quebec?

    Anonymous

    March 4, 2010 at 7:12 pm

  10. Thomas Dean Nordlum,

    I agree with you 100%. It is a normal reflex for an average Quebecer not to consider someone that cannot speak the French spoken here as Québécois or 100% Québécois. It happens everywhere in the world. French is my second language and my proficiency in spoken French still sucks and yet I don’t mind if some Quebecers do not consider me as a Québécois because of this even though I was born here. Just because you are not considered Québécois does not mean that you are excluded. I have been welcomed in this society just fine.

    You are right to say that this attitude is not racist. If the Québécois de souche were racists, they would not be considering people from immigrant families such as Pierre Curzi, Pierre-Marc Johnson, and Daniel Johnson as 100% Québécois. These people, as you can tell by their names, are not Québécois de souche but they are considered completely Québécois because they were born here, speak the French spoken here, and are immersed into the society.

    People are hypersensitive.

    Antonio

    March 4, 2010 at 8:38 pm

  11. CooOOool…

    Pure Laine

    March 4, 2010 at 10:13 pm

  12. “But in Québec, it’s different, I suppose. Here they’re racist, since everyone likes to turn a language thing into a race thing.”

    Who said that it’s different here in Quebec?

    I AM BEING SARCASTIC HERE. I MEAN THAT PEOPLE EXPECT QUÉBEC TO BE BETTER THAN THE REST OF THE WORLD AND TO LOOK UPON AND THINK OF ALL PEOPLE WHO ARE HERE AS TRUE QUÉBÉCOIS. WHY SHOULD QUÉBEC BE ANY DIFFERENT? DON’T YOU THINK PEOPLE ONLY MAKE SUCH STATEMENTS BECAUSE THEY ARE LOOKING FOR ANY LITTLE THING TO BE ABLE TO SAY ‘HA! SEE, RACIST BASTARDS! WE KNEW YOU WERE XENOPHOBIC WANTING PEOPLE TO SPEAK YOUR LANGUAGE’ OR WHATEVER.

    AS FOR THE REST OF WHAT YOU SAID, WELL, SURE, I AGREE WITH YOU, BUT YOU’RE ASKING PEOPLE IN QUÉBEC TO DO SOMETHING THAT IS NOT DONE ANYWHERE ELSE. I AM NOT ARGUING WHETHER OR NOT IT’S HARD FOR THOSE PEOPLE, WHOEVER THEY ARE, TO NOT FEEL AS IF THEY BELONG. BUT THIS IS USUALLY USED AS A REASON TO SAY PEOPLE IN QUÉBEC ARE RACIST, DON’T ACCEPT PEOPLE, ETC . . .THOUGH I WOULD LIKE FOR SOMEONE TO SHOW ME A PLACE WHERE THE PEOPLE ARE NOT LIKE THIS? AN AGAIN, I AM NOT TALKING ABOUT SKIN COLOR, BUT ACCENTS. IF THAT’S WHAT YOU MEANT BY VISIBLE MINTORITY, WELL, THEN FINE. IF THERE ARE FRANCOPHONES IN MANITOBA TODAY WHO MANAGE TO SPEAK ENGLISH WITH AN ACCENT (I SAY THIS COS THEIR ENGLISH SOUNDS LIKE IT’S THEIR FIRST LANGUAGE, AND IN A WAY, I SUPPOSE IT IS) DO YOU THINK THE REST OF THE PEOPLE AREN’T GOING TO THINK ‘FRENCH CANADIAN’ AND NOT JUST CANADIAN OR MANITOBAN? IT’S NOT RACIST OR XENOPHOBIC, JUST HOW GROUPS ARE, I THINK.

    btw, the majiscules were just to separate my words from yours.

    Thomas Dean Nordlum

    March 5, 2010 at 4:08 pm

  13. Tony the French Quebecer don’t hate and reject “les autres”like you said. It the reason why here do Bill 22 and 101 for forcing “les autres” going to school and lives whit him and d’not accept etnict guetto. The etnict vote are not a Parizeau invention. In Canada media all time Québecer vote this , french that, english this afro-canadian or Mohawk this. In Usa you can said black man live in NY born around 2hr pm in California vote this , is not a probleme but for you all be raciste when it from french quebecer. Sorry for my english spelling. Rarely I write in english because I m not very good and I respect the language for your offert “mi english version”

    Marvel

    March 5, 2010 at 4:38 pm

  14. tdn,

    it is not necessary to shout. and if you think you can convince anyone otherwise that you are not shouting) – good luck with that.

    johnnyonline

    March 5, 2010 at 8:44 pm

  15. TDN just for you and your Manitoba
    Act to provide that the English Language
    shall be the Official Language
    of the Province of Manitoba
    Her Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba, enacts as fellows:

    Article 1

    English language be official language

    (1) Any statute or law to the contrary notwithstanding, the English language only shall be used in the records and journals of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba, and in any pleadings or process in or issuing from any court in the province of Manitoba.

    Statutes

    (2) The Acts of the Legislature of Manitoba need be printend and publishing only in the English Language.

    Article 2

    Act to apply only within jurisdiction of Legislature

    This Act applies only so far as the Legislature has jurisdiction to enact.

    Marvel

    March 5, 2010 at 9:18 pm

  16. “AS FOR THE REST OF WHAT YOU SAID, WELL, SURE, I AGREE WITH YOU, BUT YOU’RE ASKING PEOPLE IN QUÉBEC TO DO SOMETHING THAT IS NOT DONE ANYWHERE ELSE.”

    Nowhere in my statement do I say this.

    “I MEAN THAT PEOPLE EXPECT QUÉBEC TO BE BETTER THAN THE REST OF THE WORLD AND TO LOOK UPON AND THINK OF ALL PEOPLE WHO ARE HERE AS TRUE QUÉBÉCOIS. WHY SHOULD QUÉBEC BE ANY DIFFERENT? DON’T YOU THINK PEOPLE ONLY MAKE SUCH STATEMENTS BECAUSE THEY ARE LOOKING FOR ANY LITTLE THING TO BE ABLE TO SAY ‘HA! SEE, RACIST BASTARDS! WE KNEW YOU WERE XENOPHOBIC WANTING PEOPLE TO SPEAK YOUR LANGUAGE’ OR WHATEVER.”

    Who are these people you are talking about? I haven’t seen anyone write something like this on this blog, nor elsewhere.

    Anonymous

    March 5, 2010 at 9:59 pm

  17. is it possible – tdn – that quebec could do better – that quebec could do something that isn’t done anywhere else. sure, why not? if it is ever going to happen – then why not in quebec; it’s as good a place as any for something extraordinary to happen.

    is it enough to aspire to the status quo?

    leonard cohen in a tune said something like —

    a man who was leaning on a crutch
    said you must not ask for too much.
    a woman who stood in the door said
    hey, why not ask for more?

    check youtube.com/watch?v=8qrriKcwvlY
    1986

    johnnyonline

    March 5, 2010 at 10:22 pm

  18. yeah, i know that song, bird on a wire. i adore leonard cohen. i knew a girl when i was 16 who said she wanted to throw herself at his feet. i think anthem is one of the most beautiful songs. and Last Year’s Man.

    oh for fuck’s sakes ‘anonymous’, the majicules were just to separate my words from the others’ because there were quotes from two different people.

    and the people i am talking about are the hypothetical people in the posts I and you made above. i am not talking about specific people, but people in general and how people generally view those who are clearly not of the majority (again, i am not talking about skin color).

    Thomas Dean Nordlum

    March 5, 2010 at 11:03 pm

  19. TDN:

    Someone on this forum very kindly directed me towards the following website so that I could take advantage of html tags. You can use them to do all sorts of things, including italicizing in order to differentiate your words from others you want to quote:

    http://www.web-source.net/html_codes_chart.htm

    Tony Kondaks

    March 6, 2010 at 1:07 am

  20. When I first heard this song I knew it would be a hit. Like Loco Locass and Sir Pathetik before, this artist understands marketing. Use identity memes and overt support for independence and you will sell rap music in La Tuque and the Sag.
    Loco Locass ,2 middle class white guys from Quebec City, saw La Haine and realized they could make space and money by grafting rap onto Franz Fanon and liberation tropes.Get Felardeau to write an intro and you are of to the races. They made a brilliant marketing decision. Two of the memebers are perenial media space monsters,with Chafik providing cover.like they said in Les Boys Marketing! Marketing!

    John

    March 7, 2010 at 3:09 pm

  21. all men become brothers:

    youtube.com/watch?v=nZJ1Tgf4JL8

    i point to this address because 1) i know that agf is a fan of music and 2) because this is an example of what is possible – ode to joy – beethoven

    more than 200 hundred years old – exquisite.

    youtube.com/watch?v=nZJ1Tgf4JL8

    you can find the second and third parts yourself, but if you do not watch the finale in part 3 well…
    suit yourself.

    johnnyonline

    March 7, 2010 at 11:02 pm

  22. “When I first heard this song I knew it would be a hit. Like Loco Locass and Sir Pathetik before, this artist understands marketing. Use identity memes and overt support for independence and you will sell rap music in La Tuque and the Sag.
    Loco Locass ,2 middle class white guys from Quebec City, saw La Haine and realized they could make space and money by grafting rap onto Franz Fanon and liberation tropes.Get Felardeau to write an intro and you are of to the races. They made a brilliant marketing decision. Two of the memebers are perenial media space monsters,with Chafik providing cover.like they said in Les Boys Marketing! Marketing!”

    Impressive knowledge of Quebec culture for a guy from PEI there John. Are you sure you aren’t at least part Acadian from Mont-Carmel or Abram-Village?

    Acajack

    March 8, 2010 at 10:41 am

  23. Good posts from a few days ago on accents and identities. On the Quebec situation, it is true that it is held to a higher standard but it is also true that the Québécois identity aspires to something higher (than the Minnesotan or the Manitoban) as well. So you have to live up to your aspirations.

    Yes, the Canadian national identity is a loosy-goosy creature to the point where some might say it is almost meaningless and that an immigrant who just got off the plane at Pearson airport speaking neither of the national languages is instantaneously considered “Canadian” by a large segment of the population in a laissez-faire sort of way.

    There is both good and bad in this “Canadian” way of doing things, and many people who come from oppressive places find this low-key, user-friendly identity to be a good fit for them.

    I know many immigrants, some of whom have integrated into the English-speaking ROC society and others who have integrated into French-speaking Quebec. Those who have integrated in the ROC generally report that the bar for being considered “Canadian” is very low. Integration is easy. On the other hand, they also report almost ZERO interest on the part of ROC Canadians about their original country’s culture, cuisine, etc. People who have integrated into Québécois society seem to have to push the envelope a bit more in order to be accepted as truly Québécois, according to what they tell me. Being Québécois isn’t just about having a car with a licence plate that says Je Me Souviens. Integration was still possible and successful in their cases, but more buy-in to the host society was demanded. On the other hand, they also report that Québécois people are very curious about their old country’s culture, cuisine and customs. But just because someone from Longueuil is interested in merengue dancing or Thai cuisine doesn’t make meringue and pad thai Québécois stuff in their eyes.

    Since I live in a border area, I also know immigrants who rub shoulders with both Québécois and Ontarians. They report the same difference: Ontarians immediately accept anyone as a Canadian but generally don’t give a shit about anything that isn’t mainstream North American in terms of culture, cuisine, etc. Québécois will be just a friendly (apparently) but only when a person is almost fully assimilated (as in the established Portuguese community of Hull) to the francophone group will they stop referring to them by their ethnic ancestry. Yet the Québécois apparently are full of questions about the “old country”, wanting to hear music from there, asking what certain words mean in their language, wanting to sample cuisine, etc… sometimes to the point of being annoying.

    Acajack

    March 8, 2010 at 11:01 am

  24. “Impressive knowledge of Quebec culture for a guy from PEI there John. Are you sure you aren’t at least part Acadian from Mont-Carmel or Abram-Village?”

    Different “John”. Though i did live in Rustico for a few months. :P

    Johndel'Atlantique

    March 8, 2010 at 12:32 pm

  25. Or should that be Johnd’Atlantique?

    Johndel'Atlantique

    March 8, 2010 at 12:49 pm

  26. Acajack,

    yeah, i think you’re right and say it well about the low bar for acceptance in the ROC and the general disinterest in the nouveau arrivant’s former place. I just encounter so much bullshit about people talking about how vastly different their cultures are in BC or Manitoba or Ohio that I feel I must tip toe around the way people in these places see cultural identity when forced to examine it a little when I don’t feel like being bothered to defend that argument.

    Thomas Dean Nordlum

    March 8, 2010 at 1:29 pm

  27. PEI! I was born in NDG . Ill change to John C and take more care of my typos. Thanks and AFG I like your blog!

    John

    March 8, 2010 at 8:37 pm

  28. Mon Dieu! I luv Monsieur Parizeau….he is rite with immigrans…to many and they roin quebec. Why if quebec has immigration policee we hav so many we dont want? Also the money is for jews to arret quebecois to hav more francophone laws. Vive le quebec libre!

    Gigi

    March 9, 2010 at 1:13 am

  29. Let me give you the truth. His music sucks and he needs the publicity. His 15 minutes are up

    Angryphone

    March 9, 2010 at 11:41 am

  30. Angryphone, yeah it does suck. Cringe-worthy stuff. But who are we to decide what is good? No doubt folks’ll lap this up

    Acajack, I figured it’d be you who’d comment on the other John’s comment (thinking it was me). And. aside from Falardeau I’ve no idea what he said. If he’d said Annie Blanchard, Marie-Jo Therio or, of course Edith Butler then we’d be on the same page. Just as much my crowd as the Rankins, Great Big Sea or Haywire. :P

    Johndel'Atlantique

    March 10, 2010 at 9:38 am


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