AngryFrenchGuy

Drunken Anglo-Canadian Mob Beats up One of Their Own: Kevin Parent

with 173 comments

Québec signer Kevin Parent, the all-time best-selling artists in Québec music history after Céline Dion, was beat up by a mob of drunken tourists a couple of night ago while out on the town in Québec City.

The singer suffered a concussion and says he remembers nothing of the incident, but bystanders report the attackers were drunken English-speaking tourists.

As if the apparently xenophobic attack was not pathetic enough, Kevin Parent is himself an Anglo.  The morons beat up one of their own.

“This incident made me understand the rage of the oppressed Québec francophone who is pissed on in his own city, in his capital, during his own carnival…”, declared Parent in a press conference on Tuesday.

“I spent years building a bridge between French and English.  I spent years going to the Junos to say that the Québécois are cool and going to the [French-language music award ceremony] l’ADISQ to say that Anglophones are not all boring and are good people…”

Essentially famous for his French-language albums, Kevin Parent’s mother tongue is English.  Just like Mary Travers, a.k.a. La Bolduc, who became Québec’s first ever popstar during the Depression, Kevin Parent is a Anglo from the maritime region of Gaspésie who made records in French.

In a move that says a lot about the impressive vitality of Québec’s music scene, in 2007 Parent reportedly had to leave his record label, Tacca records–ironically run by fellow Anglo Donald K. Tarlton–and join Audiogram to finally record his first English language album.

The incident is reminiscent of another in 1997 when Québec legend Serge Fiori, frontman of Harmonium, was also allegedly attacked by four drunken English-speaking women in Montreal.  The women were later acquitted.

Although Fiori and Harmonium are closely associated with the  Québec nationalism of the 1970’s, he declared in a 2007 interview with Richard Martineau that he “functions a lot in English, writes in English”, and even seriously considered starting over, in California, in English, under another name when fame back home became to much to bear.

Anglo on Anglo xenophobic violence…  The English-canadian press is reportedly brainstorming ways to blame the attacks on the separatists…

Written by angryfrenchguy

February 23, 2010 at 6:04 pm

173 Responses

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  1. who cares what the numbers are? today tomorrow or never.
    it doesn’t change my life in any way. and i doubt it has any effect on yours.

    your question is not relevant to daily life in quebec in the same way that some dsylexic agnostic waking up in the middle of the night has zero relevance.

    $$$$=universal language (love/romance runs a close second).

    a waiter’s responsibility (in mexico or quebec) is to make clients feel comfortable and get them what they want as quickly as possible. a good waiter in a cafe doesn’t care what language his customers speak as long as they leave a nice fat tip – wouldn’t you agree?

    johnnyonline

    February 28, 2010 at 10:20 pm

  2. Johnny,

    This is not what I was saying at all. Take a look at what I was responding to.

    Tony seemed to be insinuating that somehow the present situation makes all these non-francophones fall all over themselves to try and speak French when in Quebec, and that in an independent Quebec this so-called “advantage” for francophones would be lost.

    Anyone who has spent any time in Quebec (even as a tourist) knows this to be totally false and ridiculous.

    Acajack

    March 1, 2010 at 7:01 am

  3. “Labelling something “spiritual” or “religious” doesn’t change anything.If you are going to claim that something exists, then you either do it on solid or shaky grounds.” (Raman)

    I think there will never be a scientifically testable basis for proving or denying the existence of a deity. Descartes got as close as I believe possible, but failed in assuming that if God existed he would necessarily be benevolent and unwilling to trick us. I’m just as willing to believe in a god who has as much regard for us as we do for the bacteria we brush off our teeth each morning. Indeed as a believer in evolution, it is not entirely unreasonable to claim that they are created in our image (we share the same basic building blocks and even some genetic machinery). Thus, arguments that a god would never permit humans to suffer horrible illnesses or to have confusing genetic material in our genomes land on deaf ears (I don’t hear your cat mewing). How much do you care about the fate of those poor souls riding on a piece of dental floss?

    My point however is that these are independent realms. The inspiration we feel when viewing an amazing sunset over the mountains (or over the ocean were I in N. California where Johnny thinks I belong), may evoke a measurable change in neural activity in the nucleus accumbens, but the spiritual aspect is, for a thinking, feeling human being, greater than the sum of the changes in neuronal firing patterns in the brain. This is precisely because the human mind transcends the body. It may be made of body-stuff, but it is simultaneously made of dreams, imagination and inspiration. You can measure, purify and catalog the body stuff all you like, but I challenge you to distill a dream.

    Even as I write this I realize that with the astounding rate of scientific progress in recent years I could be proven wrong, and would welcome (somewhat sadly) the loss of the wall between the spiritual and physical worlds. See the following amazing new research…

    http://www.technologyreview.com/biomedicine/23767/

    edward

    March 1, 2010 at 8:03 am

  4. Tony,
    Why do you assume that the daily lives of Quebeckers is consumed by foreign trade? I would imagine that >>50% of people in the province are only rarely called upon to use English in their daily routines. Why would this change in a Quebec that didn’t swear allegiance to the Queen? Would US trade suddenly skyrocket from its current levels, forcing aluminum miners to use English at work?

    edward

    March 1, 2010 at 8:39 am

  5. If you believe Wikipedia only about 35% of Francophones in Quebec claim to speak English. (Though claiming to speak English appears to have a higher bar than claiming to speak French outside of Quebec).

    edward

    March 1, 2010 at 8:43 am

  6. Michel,

    I think you once stated that you were from France but that does not change the fact that you appear to know absolutely NOTHING about Quebec.

    I don’t know where you drank the kool-aid (McGill? the ROC?) but obviously it was a super-sized serving.

    Acajack

    March 1, 2010 at 9:05 am

  7. “Tony,
    Why do you assume that the daily lives of Quebeckers is consumed by foreign trade?”

    Actually, Québec’s foreign trade, contrary to Anglo lore, exploded since the 1980’s by more than 350%. In the same period, trade with canada dropped from 65 billion dollars a year to about 13 billion.

    Language is a non issue. Québécois already speak way above average English. In any case, technology is makin the issue irrelevant. Go chat live with Chinese entrepreneurs on alibaba.com: you speak English, they speak Chinese, the machine does the rest. Not beautiful prose, but just as good as what you hear in any international business meeting.

    If France wasn’t so much on Anglo dick and rejoined the Francophopnie’s trading bloc, the French-speaking world could ask them to provide French-Mandarin translations which should take China millions of engineers, what, a week and a half?

    angryfrenchguy

    March 1, 2010 at 11:52 am

  8. AFG writes:

    Language is a non issue.

    Well, if that’s the case, let’s get rid of Bill 101.

    edward writes:

    50% of people in the province are only rarely called upon to use English in their daily routines.

    ditto.

    Tony Kondaks

    March 1, 2010 at 12:13 pm

  9. I think what he meant is that proficiency of francophones in languages other than French is not an issue. In the sense that all francophones who would need to know English (or other languages such as Spanish) for their work do indeed know how to speak it.

    Acajack

    March 1, 2010 at 1:26 pm

  10. acajack,

    let`s see – that`s twice in about one week that i got it wrong. maybe more according to others (ha-ha).

    i will be reading your posts at least twice from now on and will try not to fire off any wild shots. i have never bought into the old – geez i didn`t know it was loaded – excuse.

    sorry but i just can’t resist:
    to err is human but to forgive is divine.

    johnnyonline

    March 1, 2010 at 6:25 pm

  11. tony,

    some cannot imagine working without a net even if it dulls the senses – and when it comes to gardens – the strict formal variety is preferred – symmetry with large helpings of sharp angles and calculations.

    there is much to praise in the lack of formal structure found in an english country garden but not everyone can appreciate it. although no less contrived it lifts the soul and allows the mind to wander.

    still i have to admit that statuary of half naked figures is always pleasant and reprentations of gnomes and amphibians are a poor substitute.

    johnnyonline

    March 1, 2010 at 6:58 pm

  12. AFG, my point exactly. Language is a non issue.
    My German car was made in Mexico and sold to me in the US.
    When it needed an engine replacement in Baie Comeau I dealt with the mechanic in French because that was the only language he spoke. International trade requires just enough polyglots to bridge the gaps. The salesman at the Gap needn’t speak Chinese and the guy who sold me my cell phone doesn’t speak a word of FInnish.

    Edward

    March 1, 2010 at 10:21 pm

  13. Acajack,
    Michel may not understand the Quebec spirit but he definitely knows Quebec drivers!

    Edward

    March 1, 2010 at 10:22 pm

  14. Language is a non-issue because the government of Canada shields the quebecois from the realities of the world marketplace. 77% of that world marketplace happens to be the unilingual United States (77% represents the percentage of all Canada’s exports that go to the U.S.).

    Canada treats Quebec like a child and Quebec responds like a child. That’s why the rude awakening of independence will be that Quebec will have to embrace English like it’s the Second Coming.

    Tony Kondaks

    March 1, 2010 at 10:39 pm

  15. and speaking of the spirit of quebec – who is imitating who?

    Born in Avignon on Christmas Day 1923, Rene Girard is the author of works that have been published in more than two-dozen languages, including The Scapegoat and Things Hidden Since the Foundation of the World. His latest book, Achever Clausewitz, will be published in the U.S. in 2010 as Battling to the End: Politics, War, and Apocalypse. In 2005, Girard was inducted into the Academie Francaise.

    this is a wonderful interview (english) from last december – if you have read any mythology or like harold bloom – here is france’s answer, Rene Girard, to the thinking man’s guide to history. about 25 minutes in 5 parts.

    if it is over the top then try the next interview with thomas sowell – an economist tearing a strip off intellectuals – ironic inasmuch as he’s an academic.

    i know this stuff is not to everyone’s taste but it does make you think
    http://tv.nationalreview.com/uncommonknowledge/

    Insights with Rene Girard: Chapter 1 of 5
    http://tv.nationalreview.com/uncommonknowledge/post/?q=NmZmNTA4MzBiMWZkNzY5MTM5ZGIyYTU4Mzc2YjE5ZWM=

    Insights with Rene Girard: Chapter 2 of 5
    Rene Girard describes how conflicts are resolved, and why human society is not marked by total conflict all the time
    http://tv.nationalreview.com/uncommonknowledge/post/?q=ZTdmMjRhZTgxMjMyNzc3MzFhMGUyMTNlOGRhNmM3NTI=

    Insights with Rene Girard: Chapter 3 of 5
    What is the connection between myth and Christianity? Rene Girard responds.
    http://tv.nationalreview.com/uncommonknowledge/post/?q=NTVlNGRiOWQ0OTYwYjQwMzIwYzk4MmZkOTM2NzgzMmM=

    Insights with Rene Girard: Chapter 4 of 5
    “History . . . is a test of mankind,” says Rene Girard, and “mankind is failing that test.”
    http://tv.nationalreview.com/uncommonknowledge/post/?q=N2RkMGNlNzRkYTU2MmYxNTM2N2IxZDc0NTNmOWRkNjM=

    Insights with Rene Girard: Chapter 5 of 5
    Rene Girard explains how he makes sense of, “On Earth peace, good will toward men.”
    http://tv.nationalreview.com/uncommonknowledge/post/?q=OGU4M2IwNjg2MDQ3MWE4NDkyY2RiYjVjYWM4YmFmMGQ=

    johnnyonline

    March 1, 2010 at 10:56 pm

  16. Please explain how Canada shields Quebec. From English? I suspect Quebec has the highest number of truly bilingual citizens? What change would independence bring?

    Does Canada treat Ontario like a child? How about Nova Scotia? What exactly does this mean?

    edward

    March 1, 2010 at 11:18 pm

  17. How Canada shields Quebec:

    1) equalization payments shield Quebec from suffering the economic consequences of their language policy.

    2) Canada insists upon Quebec getting its share of factories and contracts from companies that want to deal with Canada that they otherwise wouldn’t get.

    3) Canada provides Quebec with many bilingual services in dealing with the outside world that they otherwise would have to provide for themselves

    4) Canada allows Quebec to have Bill 101

    Tony Kondaks

    March 1, 2010 at 11:43 pm

  18. The change that independence would bring (and I am repeating myself as I’ve said this often here) is that in order to attract capital and entrepreneurship and professionals to come and live in Quebec that they would have to be user-friendly to unilingual anglophones from the rest of Canada and the U.S. who won’t come if they have to live in French. Quebec does that now and has been doing that for years when they negotiate deals with American companies they often provide their employees waivers to send their children to English schools in order to get the companies to come here.

    There’s a big company on the West Island that deals in electronics (I forget their name) and Bernard Landry once paid them a visit in order to get them to francize their business because they were operating outside the law (Bill 101 francization provisions) and the president told him point-blank: if you insist on us francizing, we’ll leave Quebec. And Landry never bothered him again.

    What does it mean to treat Quebec like a child? The best example is the Harper motion telling Quebec that its people constituted a nation. Trying to placate a people who claim to be a nation by telling them: good boys! Here, we’re going to make you a nation by passing this motion in parliament that says your a nation!

    Only children would be placated by such a move.

    I hope it has the opposite effect and that the Quebec people recognize it for the insult that it is.

    Tony Kondaks

    March 1, 2010 at 11:49 pm

  19. “let`s see – that`s twice in about one week that i got it wrong. maybe more according to others (ha-ha).
    i will be reading your posts at least twice from now on and will try not to fire off any wild shots. i have never bought into the old – geez i didn`t know it was loaded – excuse.
    sorry but i just can’t resist:
    to err is human but to forgive is divine.”

    Johnny, I’ve never doubted your “sharpness” for a second! ;-))

    Acajack

    March 2, 2010 at 6:18 am

  20. “How Canada shields Quebec:
    1) equalization payments shield Quebec from suffering the economic consequences of their language policy.
    2) Canada insists upon Quebec getting its share of factories and contracts from companies that want to deal with Canada that they otherwise wouldn’t get.
    3) Canada provides Quebec with many bilingual services in dealing with the outside world that they otherwise would have to provide for themselves
    4) Canada allows Quebec to have Bill 101”

    While you are undoubtedly right that independence would lead to some type of adjustment, it seems a bit convoluted to go as far as you do and suggest it would automatically lead to “more English”.

    It seems to me as though you think any scenario automatically means francophones should always politely and submissively speak to anglophones in English “when spoken to”.

    Quebec remains in Canada = all francophones have to submissively speak to anglophones in English “when spoken to”

    Quebec becomes independent = all francophones have to submissively speak to anglophones in English “when spoken to”

    Quebec becomes part of France = all francophones have to submissively speak to anglophones in English “when spoken to”

    Quebec splits off from the earth’s crust and goes into outer space = all francophones have to submissively speak to anglophones in English “when spoken to”

    Quebec joins the Klingon empire = all francophones have to submissively speak to anglophones in English “when spoken to”

    A gigantic meteor smashes into Quebec and kills everyone living here = all francophones have to submissively speak to anglophones in English “when spoken to”

    Acajack

    March 2, 2010 at 6:23 am

  21. Mon Dieu! I am to soon be learning anglais…for my werk is want that I can be bilingual. Why? I am mime…I not half to talk…I put beret on ground, passersby drop coins…no talk.

    L’Enfant Oui Rene! Oh, I rememer papa tell me he vote separatiste in 1980. Not reelly he is separatiste but Monsieur Levesque give to him free newspaper subscripshun…deel to good to pass up. Papa wish for old times avec Duplessis..oui, sometime neighbour go missing in nite, but always we hav baguette, soup, vin, fromage and cigarettes….good time mon ami.
    Papa is rite, anglos wipe foots on quebec flag..Mon Dieu! Terrible! quebec is grate nation. when I am turn 14 mama and papa turn me out with drug store rouge and bag ov party baloons. wus hard but chantal hebert and josee legault shew me ropes. Tres bien mon ami!

    Gigi

    March 2, 2010 at 7:24 am

  22. Acajack writes:

    It seems to me as though you think any scenario automatically means francophones should always politely and submissively speak to anglophones in English “when spoken to”.

    No, that isn’t what I mean at all.

    What I mean is that to maintain the high economic standard of living the quebecois have become accustomed to they most definitely will have to accomodate unilingual anglophones living in Quebec and encouraging them to come.

    Whether individual francophones decide to address anglophones in English will be decided on an individual, one-on-one basis. But the legal structure must change in order to accomodate the existence and flourishing of unilingual English in an independent Quebec.

    Tony Kondaks

    March 2, 2010 at 1:46 pm

  23. edward asks:

    Does Canada treat Ontario like a child? How about Nova Scotia? What exactly does this mean?

    Dunno. Not interested in how Canada interacts with mere provinces.

    Quebec wants — no, demands — to be treated as a distinct society or as a nation. Except on the days when they hand out equalization payments which, according to the constitution, is available only to provinces. On those days Quebec miraculously transforms back into a province.

    So as a matter of course, I don’t compare Quebec to mere provinces.

    Tony Kondaks

    March 2, 2010 at 1:49 pm

  24. When I paid my taxes to Ottawa I do not discount “distinct society ” .

    Marvel

    March 2, 2010 at 6:02 pm

  25. I am a French Quebecer living in Mexico just a few miles south of San Diego. I have not been in Quebec for 10 years and I don’t miss it one bit. Sometimes I wonder why that is. Reading blogs like this one point to an answer: I hated the weather there, the political weather and all the other sorry rainy stuff and cold crap!

    jacques

    March 2, 2010 at 7:01 pm

  26. Jacques: on en a rien a foutre de tes états d’ame: si ca t’intéresse pas , qu’est-ce que tu viens faire ici?

    midnightjack

    March 2, 2010 at 8:24 pm

  27. Tijuana. All the cultural benefits of Forestville but without any of the snow.

    edward

    March 2, 2010 at 10:13 pm

  28. Jacques: on en a rien a foutre de tes états d’ame: si ca t’intéresse pas , qu’est-ce que tu viens faire ici?

    Je commence penser le meme choix comme jacques. La Canada est fin avec tout le cotes contre le pays. La Quebec, La Canada, Les francos, les anglais,,,je suis tres fatigue avec tout le choses.. Je pense notre pays pourriez etre mieux sans Quebec et la Quebec mieux sans le maudits anglo que vous haine.. Alors allez votre chemin mon amis du quebec. Il est la seule choix pour tout le monde avec un bon fin pour tous. Bonne chance avec votre nouvelle pays. Mais, payez les facture quand vous allez, comme une bien ami. Si non, je ne pense pas vous sont honnete et avoir le sense du dignite.

    ABP

    March 2, 2010 at 10:27 pm

  29. a bit of sunshine in early march.

    “If winter comes, can spring be far behind?”
    Percy Byshe Shelley (1792 – 1822)

    quebec seized its past and present and set out to create its very own future with 101 ( a social engineering project on the scale of hydro quebec) – most people in quebec believed it was the right way to go and most still do. er, i beg to differ.

    a project by a goverment comprised of radicals, a lot of hard core socialists, and many left wing reformers who shared a common political goal that promoted independance in one form or another was supported by an overwhelming majority of the francophone community in quebec EVEN IF they had not voted for that government – in short it was popular.

    the perception in the rest of canada, and this is unfortunate, is that the law was perceived to be a rejection of the federation as opposed to an affirmation of quebec. sarcastically – i need to ask myself why anyone could think such a thought.

    considering the law’s provenance, there is a substantial grain of truth in the preception of “rejection ” even if the sentiment sprung from emotion — however — rejection was not the primary goal. affirmation was the goal and some will argue that independance was just the logical eventuality.

    the primary goal of secession or rejection of the federation was actually another project to come later; built on the back of a very popular (but divisive) law. we all know this was a close-but-no-cigar moment the last time it occurred. but the bitter fallout of this secessionist movement and the erroneous perception of rejection continues to this day outside quebec. it’s amazing how all societies get torn up from time to time with envy desire and resulting rivalry.

    the secessionists (plateau’s go-gogauche) are disingenious if they suggest anything else accounts for resentments that they are wont to characterise as animosities or outright hostility. that’s not to say hostilities between marxists and capitalists don’t exist but suggesting it is exclusively a language/culture line is sophmoric at best. to this day people can be seen wearing che t-shirts thinking he was a “good guy.” try spelling l-u-c-i-d-e.

    today, in quebec, the perception of affirmation and secession as horses of two different colours is clear. today. now. and the courts have also sorted out and established that quebec must temper its political manoeuverings re: 101. the quiet revolution that got noisy is over – those days are done with.

    the thick not thin wedge of 101 that was supposed to help carry quebec into nationhood turned out to be a very big factor in the movement’s faded sense of urgency. now that’s something for all the world’s social engineers think about. the next question might be – is 101 beneficial to quebec – how do we measure that?

    it is only a matter of time before the population outside quebec – our fellow canadians comes around to the perception that distinguishes affirmation and rejection because every year that goes by without a referendum – it will become more and more apparent that quebec wants to renegociate – not for independance but the better deal and dream they originally signed onto (just like alberta, saskatchewan, bc and newfoundlandand)

    eventually a new document will be signed. canada’s constitutional history shows that new documents are built on top of the existing ones. history will repeat itself.

    i think this will occur later rather than sooner because quebec is ahead of the curve and up to eyeballs in debt – $8 billion a year without the formal signing of a contract on top of our very own tax system is not too difficult to live with. realistically though, everyone knows that it cannot last forever.

    albertans are already asking some very hard questions – like the germans (who cannot retire before 67) will be asking hard questions about why their money is being given to greeks (who retire at 58.) i say this because there is no day care programme in alberta anywhere near what quebec enjoys.

    funny eh?
    quebec – a prime driver in canada’s bright future.

    johnnyonline

    March 2, 2010 at 10:38 pm

  30. “No, that isn’t what I mean at all.
    What I mean is that to maintain the high economic standard of living the quebecois have become accustomed to they most definitely will have to accomodate unilingual anglophones living in Quebec and encouraging them to come.
    Whether individual francophones decide to address anglophones in English will be decided on an individual, one-on-one basis. But the legal structure must change in order to accomodate the existence and flourishing of unilingual English in an independent Quebec.No, that isn’t what I mean at all.
    What I mean is that to maintain the high economic standard of living the quebecois have become accustomed to they most definitely will have to accomodate unilingual anglophones living in Quebec and encouraging them to come.
    Whether individual francophones decide to address anglophones in English will be decided on an individual, one-on-one basis. But the legal structure must change in order to accomodate the existence and flourishing of unilingual English in an independent Quebec.”

    There are plenty of places (including many in North America) in the world that allow the unfettered “existence and flourishing of unilingual English” that are economic basket cases, so I don’t see your point.

    Sorry, but I don’t see the English language as possessing magical qualities compared to other languages, nor do I see English speakers as demi-gods who carry within them the promise of economic salvation.

    If English its speakers can’t do much for Newfoundland, West Virginia, Mississippi, southwestern Ontario, the Bronx, Detroit, Jamaica and Sierra Leone, then I think I’d just as soon have Quebec take its chances with French, thank you very much.

    Acajack

    March 2, 2010 at 11:43 pm


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