AngryFrenchGuy

Segregation, gangsters, dead african dictators and fabulous cops. AngryFrenchGuy’s Quebec 2009

with 65 comments

Orwellian moment of the year: “Cultural community leaders” (and members of the Mayor of Montréal Gérald Tremblay’s political party…) Marvin Rotrand, Robert Libman, Tony Sciascia, Kéder Hippolyte and Alan DeSousa call rival candidate Louise Harel a xenophobe because she expressed the wish Montrealers were not divided along ethnic and linguistic lines.

Second best idea by Montréal Mayor Gérald Tremblay (after those bixi bikes): « It is clear that Montreal’s cultural communities want more and more to get involved at the level of municipal politics, and our party Union Montréal understood that need. »

Municipal political party that had the fewest “cultural community” candidates in the 2009 election: Gérald Tremblay’s Union Montréal

Best argument in a Montreal Gazette editorial in favour of ethnic ghettos: «The big municipal parties choose their candidates centrally, which makes it easy to leave little room for anglophones, allophones, and visible minorities of all language groups. »

Number of visible minority columnists at the Gazette: 0

The unintended consequence of the year: The hysterical campaign against the separatist Louise Harel’s bid to become mayor of Montréal helps socialist separatist muslim Richard Bergeron rise from fringe candidate to within 12 point of being elected mayor. The Montreal Gazette’s bosses at CanWest were not happy about that.

Worst new Canadian trend of the year: Segregation.

Most unconvincing attempt to hide the fact you’re just another rich English-speaking  white guy of the year: The CDPQ’s new boss, Anglo Micheal Sabia, tries to get an easy confirmation hearing by posing as a poor defenseless immigrant: «As an allophone, I consider that I have deep roots here, in Québec.»

Fake punt of the year: Bob Gainey fires Hab’s coach Guy Carbonneau just as former Caisse de Placement et de Dépôt boss Henri-Paul Rousseau begins explaining how he lost all of Québec’s retirement money.

Anglocentric quote of the year: Eric Amber. « You obviously can’t read English because you are an uneducated bigot. Go fuck yourself. »

Lie of the Year: Tie. « Louise Harel doesn’t speak English » and « French is not threatened in Montréal »

Most solid argument in a Montreal Gazette editorial on the health of French in Montreal: “Ninety per cent of Quebec francophones think French is threatened. It isn’t.”

Dumbest separatist demo of the year: Demo against Anglos performing at L’Aut Saint-Jean

Worst proposed language policy of the year: The Parti québécois’s French-only kindergartens.

Best measure to protect French in Québec: Jean Charest signs a series of deals that lets workers from France and Québec work in each other’s countries.

Worst English by a Québec politician: Louise Harel and Pauline Marois

Best French by a politician from outside Québec or New Brunswick: Ontario premier Dalton McGuinty

Liberal of the year: Tony Acursso

Conservative of the year: Micheal Ignatieff

Independantist of the year: Amir Khadir

Federalist of the year: Nicolas Sarkozy

English Canadian of the year: Richard Colvin

Most unexpected friend of Québec: Gazprom’s Alexander Medvedev hints that he wants to buy an NHL franchise and move it to Québec City.

Pipe dream of the year: An NHL franchise in Québec City.

Imperialist scion of the year: Beer baron and Habs owner Goeff Molson’s made a good impression on the TV show Tout le Monde en Parle, but no one seemed to realise just how much of a truly astonishing TV moment it was. The Molsons have not come out to chat with the rabble many times since their ancestor John purchased the Province of Québec some 200 years ago. That Geoff Molson spoke fluent French, and even reminisced about going to French school is like Cecil J. Rhodes’ great-grandson speaking Xhosa on South African TV and talking about his education in a desegregated Bantu school. Sure the whole thing was carefully scripted by Le Cabinet de Relations Publiques National. It was an important moment of reconciliation nonetheless.

Political prospect of the year: He’s the mayor of a logging town, he’s a former union boss, he represents Québec at OECD meetings about rural development. Few other Québec politicians could have as broad appeal both in the « regions » and in cosmopolitan Montreal like Haiti-born immigrant Michel Adrien. God even gave him a tornado to raise his national profile in 2009!

Most ungrateful polish immigrant: Bernard Adamus in Voir: « Canada is… Bryan Adams and 10 years in jail for Paul Rose. »

Underreported story of the year: Ethnic profiling in Montréal-Nord

Letter to the editor of the year: Julius Grey in le Devoir on Bill 104

Independence referendum of the year: 90% of Catalans vote to separate from Spain in a non-biding referendum.

Most unconvincing promotion of Québec’s independence by a soverigntist party: The Parti Québécois

Best unsolicited interference by a foreign leader in Québec politics: Dead african dictator Omar Bongo casts winning vote for (former) new Action Démocratique du Québec leader Gilles Taillon..

SpaceClown of the Year: Tie. Cirque du Soleil founder and Westmount MP Marc Garneau

Fabulous fashion statement of the year: Cops in pink camouflage.

Written by angryfrenchguy

December 27, 2009 at 8:48 pm

65 Responses

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  1. Antonio writes:

    This is evident in the USA which has extreme polarization of wealth.

    I don’t necessarily disagree with the rest of your post, Antonio, but I do take issue with the above.

    There is quite a lot of regulation in American business life (too much in my opinion!). For example, the US has the most stringent environmental laws in the world. Banking, finance, medicine, manufacturing, and pharmaceuticals are examples of sectors with a lot of regulation as well.

    One area that is thriving — technology, particularly internet and computers — is an example of a sector in which very little government intervention is present.

    I don’t know what you mean by “extreme polarizations of wealth”: do you mean net worth? Income?

    I find both of those standards of measurement lacking in their ability to give us the information we need about a nation’s financial health. I care not whether there is great polarization of either wealth or income as long as most or all in society have access to the basic necessities of life: shelter, nutrition, health care, education, clothing, etc. This is the standard upon which I believe the determination of a country’s financial health should be made. And if it is, the US has very little polarization of wealth.

    A better example of extreme polarization of wealth would be Cuba where 1% of the population — the members of the Communist Party — live like kings with all the best food and health care and the rest of the population has virtually no health care and whether they eat from one day to the next is a questionable thing. And there is not much capitalism to speak of in Cuba…however, what little there is or what capitalism inputs from outside (foreign investment, tourist trade) is actually what keeps the country afloat at all.

    Tony Kondaks

    January 9, 2010 at 9:13 pm

  2. So, Johnny, how would a hardcore libertarian like yourself handle snow removal, criminal justice, or national defense without involving the government?

    There are many examples of how taxes represent the most efficient way to achieve social benefits.

    There are also examples of how it could be done better by private enterprise, but NEVER without regulation of some kind.

    For example if bankruptcy laws, or limited liability corporations were done away with, what kind of chilling effect might that have on free enterprise?

    Edvaard

    January 9, 2010 at 9:39 pm

  3. antonio: “we have degrees of socialism”
    the least amount of government intervention is the healthiest (see tony k’s comment on technology) – this is history not difficult to observe and verify. the way i understand it, government intervention = failure. this is harsh and one-dimensional but imagine a society of enterprises comprised entirely of bricklins.

    **************

    esteem-ed – within the realm of society’s competing interests, i have NEVER endorsed anarchy or chaos. is it not amazing though, that one can navigate a busy sidewalk downtown on foot or city street by car and arrive without a collision?

    if only the government were limited to national defence, criminal justice and snow removal – i would be jumping up and down in celebration – it would be even better if we could get some of that global warming/climate change and sell the snow blower fleet to london england.

    yesterday, (this is anecdotal) some sales rep from plano texas is on the phone explaining to me the benefits of a new service/product. the conversation goes on for some 20 minutes and we get off topic a couple of times – anyhoo – he confides that his girlfriend’s father works for the us postal service and that last july 4 – his prospective father-in-law shockingly dropped a figure of $110,000.00 as compensation for work plus health care plus pension plus plus plus…

    i have nothing against this man and think he has had the good fortune to be in the right place at the right time in order to enjoy a “degree of socialism” – but at the same time i am definitely scratching my head and thinking there is a distortion in the cosmic fabric you could drive a fedex jet through.

    the guy was not a jet pilot – the guy was a mailman. and if you want to know the botom line – “this” mailman probably made more money than a guy or gal who flies jets for fedex. go figure.

    i am not calling for interventions or new laws – just hoping for the exact opposite – less politicians, less governemamman and less laws. this would translate (for the economically challenged) as less taxes.

    and if i haven’t mentioned it before, wal-mart has done more to increase the spending power for the lowest economic rung in the last twenty years in real dollar terms than any food stamp or social program in the same period. and i will underline this with the fact that before the advent of laissez-faire and the industrial revolution, life was correctly characterised as “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.”

    johnnyonline

    January 9, 2010 at 11:43 pm

  4. Every society has its peculiar restrictions.

    One has to chose what restrictions one wants to work within.

    Raman

    January 10, 2010 at 7:23 am

  5. The effects of the recent financial crisis on the USA’s and Canadian economies have demonstrated the benefits of adequate regulations. The Canadian banking sector and homeowners are much better off.

    Based on the Gini coefficient, Canada is in a better position than the USA, when it comes to inequality of income.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gini_coefficient#Income_Gini_indices_in_the_world

    Joe Blow

    January 10, 2010 at 9:12 am

  6. johnnyonline wrote:

    and if i haven’t mentioned it before, wal-mart has done more to increase the spending power for the lowest economic rung in the last twenty years in real dollar terms than any food stamp or social program in the same period.

    Post of the week.

    And isn’t it ironic that the unions that were successful in shutting down jQuebec’s Jonquiere Wal-Mart in 2005 actually decreased the standard of living of not only the employees who lost their jobs but the people of Jonquiere who could no longer shop at Wal-Mart.

    The following is the text of a letter I had published in The Gazette on this topic on Feb. 12, 2005:

    Congratulations to the United Food and Commercial Workers Union (UFCW) and its success at getting Wal-Mart to shut its Jonquiere store (Gazette, Feb. 10, “Wal-Mart to shut unionized store”). The union is ensuring Jonquiere’s poorer residents will once again subsidize its richer ones.

    Without a Wal-Mart, shoppers will have to patronize smaller, less-efficient businesses owned by smaller corporations and independent operators. For the most part, corporate shareholders and those who own their own businesses are not poor people but, rather, middle and upper class.

    It’s also true a disproportionate percentage of Wal-Mart shoppers are on the lower end of the socio-economic range.

    Those who prevent Wal-Mart’s presence in a community, therefore, create a situation in which the less-efficient businesses – which charge more for the same product than Wal-Mart – get more revenue by having the less fortunate give up more of their money to those economically better off than they are.

    In other words, the poor people keep less of their money and the already-richer business owners and corporate shareholders get even more money. Thanks, UFCW, for supporting the subsidy of richer people by poorer people.

    Tony Kondaks

    January 10, 2010 at 1:58 pm

  7. Tony Kondaks,

    When I mean extreme polarization of wealth, I mean wealth or income inequality as the hyperlink by Joe Blow shows. I should have used the official economic term.

    I didn’t say that the USA has the worst wealth or income inequality. Other countries are worst, notably Cuba as your example, and North Korea. However, there are other countries that perform better than the USA. These countries are more for governmental intervention and assistance than the USA; it is to these countries that I compare the USA to, not totalitarian states like Cuba.

    No country in the world truly practices laissez-faire capitalism but the USA is closest to this model compared to other countries and yet the others have performed better. I am thinking of the northern European countires and Scandinavian countries that regularly have higher standards of living and less wealth and income inequality. The hyperlink by Joe Blow shows this. These countries have found the right balance between regulated capitalism and governmental assistance.

    You mention technology as an example of how little governmental invention is a boon. I disagree. I predict that there will be a crash in this sector in the near future because of the hyper-competitive nature which forces new technologies into the market too soon. This would lead to a drying up of customers tired of buying newer technologies to replace still new technologies, causing a slump. As an example, the TV industry is not doing well because they have been trying to push Blu-ray to replace the still-new DVD. The customers have not responded causing a slump in the TV industry leading to a slashing of prices leading to unprofitablility. And they still haven’t learned their lesson because they are now trying to push 3-D TVs into the market to replace HDTVs which are still relatively new to the market. For a TV industry reeling from the failure of Blu-ray in penetrating the market, the 3-D technology push might be fatal to this industry.

    Antonio

    January 10, 2010 at 7:01 pm

  8. Tony Kondaks,

    I disagree with you on your this statement:

    “For the most part, corporate shareholders and those who own their own businesses are not poor people but, rather, middle and upper class.”

    I see no evidence that these businesses are from the mddle and upper class. Furthermore, someone that values competition like you do would condemn Wal-Mart for trying to create a monopoly for itself in the retail sector by using unethical practices such as predatory prices to destroy competition. See this link: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/al-norman/new-study-wal-mart-brings_b_417808.html

    Antonio

    January 10, 2010 at 7:11 pm

  9. Antonio writes:

    Furthermore, someone that values competition like you do would condemn Wal-Mart for trying to create a monopoly for itself in the retail sector by using unethical practices such as predatory prices to destroy competition.

    Monopolies per se are neither illegal nor bad things. If it occurs as a result of predator pricing, well, my understanding is that is illegal and if that’s the case with Wal-Mart they should be dealt with accordingly.

    As for Al Norman’s HuffPo article, the gist of it seems to be that Wal-Mart entering urban areas ends up creating zero net jobs because Wal-Mart’s low prices end up putting a lot of people out of business.

    I won’t dispute that…but why is that necessarily a “bad” thing. If Wal-Mart can provide better prices more efficiently than others, why should those others stay in business? And who’s to say someone else won’t come along with a better business model than Wal-Mart and put them out of business.

    When Woolworth’s first came onto the scene, they were the Wal-Mart of their day. And the same complaints about Woolworth’s putting the Mom and Pop stores out of business occurred. And people tried to legislate against it.

    Well, where is Woolworth’s today? Practically non-existent.

    If, as Johnnyonline indicated, Wal-Mart is putting more money in poor people’s pockets then I say there’s nothing wrong with that.

    Tony Kondaks

    January 10, 2010 at 7:45 pm

  10. “I won’t dispute that…but why is that necessarily a “bad” thing. If Wal-Mart can provide better prices more efficiently than others, why should those others stay in business? ”

    Define better prices. If you mean lowerand cheap prices, that is only a good thing for customers but a bad thing for employers and employees.

    “If, as Johnnyonline indicated, Wal-Mart is putting more money in poor people’s pockets then I say there’s nothing wrong with that.”

    They are only putting money in customers’ pockets, whether they are poor or not. They are not putting money in employers’ and employees’ pockets. That is the problem. There has to be a balance between the needs of customers and those of employers and employees. Wal-Mart destroys that by “favouring” only the customers. Employers and employees have to earn a living too and needs profits to do so.

    Antonio

    January 10, 2010 at 8:05 pm

  11. “and if i haven’t mentioned it before, wal-mart has done more to increase the spending power for the lowest economic rung in the last twenty years in real dollar terms than any food stamp or social program in the same period.”

    I could not disagree more. Walmart has destroyed the lives of the working classes by essentially addicting them the cheap crap, and getting them to trade a decent wage that might have been earned as a skilled craftsman or labourer in exchange for 25 cent christmas tree ornaments made in china.

    Great! now they have cheap ornaments, kitchenware that falls apart after one year and clothing made in sweatshops in southeast asia. Those sweatshop wages lower the prices of the goods sold at Walmart in turn forcing the local market to lower its prices to compete until finally the local manufacturer is either priced out of business or forced to pay his workers sweatshop wages too.

    Great trade! It sure is wonderful to have increased spending power when your income is actually going down in real terms, and for many (millions of Americans) there is no salary at all.

    It has been good for China though. I’ll give Sam Walton that much.

    As for taxes and regulation, it costs nothing for me to throw my trash out in the street.
    I might get fined, but lets just do away with annoying regulations.
    It will lower my own property value, so I shouldn’t do it. Sure, but my neighbour is already doing it so my property value is already shot.
    It is unsanitary and bad for my family. See above argument.
    So what can I do? I can gather together my neighbours who are interested and organize (or pay for) a street cleaning cooperative. But it really only helps if it is bigger than just one street. Government to the rescue…

    Now apply the same logic to burning fossil fuels that pollute the environment (for free) compared with EXPENSIVE solar panels. How do I get my neighbour, (let’s call him industry) to stop throwing trash in my air? I can ask nicely, I can sue him or I can involve government. If I sue him it will only work if the lawsuit ends up costing him more than he is saving by polluting and it will cost me a fortune I don’t have in legal fees. That is where government MY REPRESENTATIVE government can come to the rescue.

    What is the alternative? A feeding frenzy for the tort lawyers or a little bit of regulation and tax incentivisation. The job of government here is to act in proxy for its citizens to force people to plan ahead for the common interest when it is financially irrational for any one company or individual to do so on his own. The classic prisoners’ dilemma writ large.

    Edouard

    January 10, 2010 at 8:44 pm

  12. By the way. I should point out that I am not just being facetious when I say Walmart has been great for China. I think that as international trade barriers fall and global markets expand it is inevitable that prices and wages will equilibrate to a certain extent. This means Chinese will obtain a much higher standard of living…but you have to recognize that that comes at the cost of our own standard of living. Equalization means that what the rich have will flow into the hands of the poor who will work harder for get it because it is worth that much more to them.

    Ironic that pure free trade represents a form of welfare for the worlds working poor that Obama and even Mao never dreamed of. Deng on the other hand has seen his dream become real…
    …but it may just turn out to be your nightmare.

    Edouard

    January 10, 2010 at 9:01 pm

  13. Antonio:

    Wal-Mart is an employer so they are helping themselves and their shareholders when they make money. In the process of doing that they may make their competitors and their competitors’ employees unhappy but that’s not their business…and, no, they have zero responsibility towards their competitors and their employees and for the life of me I cannot figure out why you think they should.

    Tony Kondaks

    January 10, 2010 at 9:53 pm

  14. “and, no, they have zero responsibility towards their competitors and their employees and for the life of me I cannot figure out why you think they should.”

    No, it is not Wal-Mart’s responsibility, but something has to be done to rein in such destructive behaviour that harm others in the goal to have as much equality of wealth and prosperity for all. It is the government and the laws and regulations that that it passes that have this responsibility, or should.

    Antonio

    January 10, 2010 at 10:15 pm

  15. edouard @ 8:44
    “I could not disagree more. Walmart has destroyed the lives of the working classes by essentially addicting them the cheap crap, and getting them to trade a decent wage that might have been earned as a skilled craftsman or labourer in exchange for 25 cent christmas tree ornaments made in china.”

    you may not have it both ways –

    here’s a company that will hire the young and inexperienced, retirees and the handicapped and you are suggesting they are destroying people’s lives. then you take a kick at sweatshops – places where there is not any other work or wage to be had.

    wave the magic wand and make it all better yesterday – i’m behind you on that 100% – except there is no magic wand. the progress is not fast enough for you – i can understand that – but your impatience is taking a toll on your critical thought process.

    it seems you do not understand that without trade commerce industry wages and money – all those individuals being taken advantage of would be where the vast majority of the planet was 200 years ago – starving, living in squalor with disease and with virtually no chance of improvement. and locally (on this continent) – all that is required in the 21st century is to stay in school and develop an interest in something – anything! and you blame the poor choices of individuals in a land of opportunity on enterprising individuals – unbelievable!

    and if you haven’t noticed – nobody is holding a gun to anyone’s head telling them to shop at wal-mart.

    pick one or the other – or unplug and move to a cave – but don’t light a fire to keep warm – wouldn’t want to pollute the environment would we?

    solar panels and windmills and goofy regulations – HA!

    in 2012 incandescent lightbulbs will no longer be available – by law we will be required to purchase the curly ones with mercury in them. have you seen the 3 page evacuation safety procedures distributed by the us environmental protection agency when one of these bulbs breaks in your house? and they suggest that it is to save electricity… from the same people who want the world to convert to electric cars.

    the german government has published a report recently describing the absolute unsustainability (failure for those who don’t sprachen die deutsche) of alternate energy – you guessed it wind and solar. why can’t they look at france and say that looks pretty good – 80% of energy needs produced by nuclear power.

    government needs to regulate itself – blue boxes and recycling – HA! 85% of glass cardboard and plastic , to this day, goes to landfill because it’s cheaper to make the stuff from scratch than purchase all the energy used to make it usable a second time – all those recycling plants would be out of business in less than a year if it were not for our tax dollars subsidising them. but don’t believe me and my feel good line of thinking – just look it up.

    or click your heels three times and get back to kansas. and when you get there you can stop suggesting i am not in favour of sanitation any time you wish.

    johnnyonline

    January 10, 2010 at 10:42 pm

  16. johnny.

    ”and if you haven’t noticed – nobody is holding a gun to anyone’s head telling them to shop at wal-mart.”

    yeah, there may not be a gun, but you don’t need a gun when there’s nowhere else to shop, now do you? Thankfully in Montréal there are still a handful of places to go, but Montréal is a big city. Try going to Medicine Hat, Alberta or Crookston, Minnesota to find anything that is not the shit sold at Wal-mart or McMerde-like ”food”.

    ”it seems you do not understand that without trade commerce industry wages and money – all those individuals being taken advantage of would be where the vast majority of the planet was 200 years ago – starving, living in squalor with disease and with virtually no chance of improvement. and locally (on this continent) ”

    I don’t think it’s really all that much better today. Our food supply has been hijacked, as it’s so very difficult, if not nearly impossible to have food that is GMO free, hormone free, non-irradiated, unprocessed/unrefined, etc . . .raw milk is illegal in most (or I think all of) North America (though you can get lait cru cheese in Québec!) and most food touted as health food like soy usually has its own industry funding that propaganda/public relations information or whatever you want to call it.

    We have flouride in our water (but not in Montréal and most of Québec! well, for now, Dorval does. I hope Québec continues to reject it) we are told things like aspertame are safe, we are not told that depleted soil in conventional farming does not give the same nutrional value to our food as before when there was more crop rotation, etc . . .but we are all too busy to care about these things. Besides, all is so much better as we are not starving in the streets now. No, we are only being fed nutrion-less garbage, are afraid to go in the sun for Vitamin D, flock to get mercury and squalene vaccines for no reason (I read that Canada’s surplus of vaccines are being lent to Mexico . . .).

    So please, before you get all smug about how much better things are now, take a few moments to think about the real price of all of our conviences of today and then ask yourself if we are really so much better off?

    Thomas Dean Nordlum

    January 11, 2010 at 9:37 am

  17. Thomas Dean Nordlum writes:

    Try going to Medicine Hat, Alberta or Crookston, Minnesota to find anything that is not the shit sold at Wal-mart or McMerde-like ”food”.

    Well, I’ve never been to either of those places but I do know how to google.

    I googled “Medicine Hat, Alberta” in Google Maps and then, once on the page that came up, added to the above words in the search bar the words “grocery stores.”

    Lo and behold, 104 hits came up:

    http://tinyurl.com/yd7eaeb

    So with all due respect, TDN, you are completely wrong. There are all sorts of choice for consumers in Medicine Hat. I haven’t googled the other place you mention in your post as I suspect you’ve attempted to bullshit us with the Medicine Hat mention. So I am not going to waste my time on a wild goose chase.

    You owe the readers of this forum an apology for BSing us.

    Tony Kondaks

    January 11, 2010 at 11:52 am

  18. Thank God for google. I feel super reassured now. I bet you can even find good food at the majority of those 104 hits too and not only mass produced shit with long shelf life.

    *i fall down on my knees with an effusive apology for BSing all of you*

    Thomas Dean Nordlum

    January 11, 2010 at 12:55 pm

  19. “So, Johnny, how would a hardcore libertarian like yourself handle snow removal, criminal justice, or national defense without involving the government?”

    Libertarianism is to the Right what Communism is (or was) to the Left. It’s real cool to say you’re down with the movement, but no one actually wants to live it.

    angryfrenchguy

    January 11, 2010 at 6:26 pm

  20. agf,

    i think you’ve hit the nail on the head with that one if you’re talking about north america – but communism is still alive and well (doing its damage) in many parts of the world. who knows what it will morph into now that they’ve hooked marx up to capital markets.

    i think it would be fair to say that since communism has been tried many many times and shown to be an abject failure in every respect (cambodia comes to mind) – maybe it would be a good time to time to try libertarian ideas. you know – maybe start with the “lite” version and replace the socialist bloc or ndp with the lpq or ldp. ;)

    i always thought dumont had a streak of it in him. and not that anyone cares – but i deny being hardcore anything – by definition it is impossible to be hardcore and libertarian at the same time. i carry no cards, have never carried any cards and definitely have never been a member of the communist party. standard disclaimer # 64A-qcan.

    and to answer the question: how would a hardcore libertarian like yourself handle snow removal, criminal justice, or national defense without involving the government? — i would read more bastiat, von mises, rothbard, hayek, friedman and our own martin masse.

    the best place to start in english is:
    /www.econlib.org/index.html

    la meilleure place en francais:
    http://www.quebecoislibre.org/

    for those who think the idea is a hollow word:
    http://mises.org/articles.aspx

    say – let’s get on to the topic of money/hockey/money

    johnnyonline

    January 11, 2010 at 9:15 pm

  21. oh bother – i forgot the best seller “atlas shrugged”
    by ayn rand. mea culpa mea culpa mea maxima etc….

    johnnyonline

    January 12, 2010 at 12:01 am

  22. That Geoff Molson spoke fluent French, and even reminisced about going to French school is like Cecil J. Rhodes’ great-grandson speaking Xhosa on South African TV and talking about his education in a desegregated Bantu school. Sure the whole thing was carefully scripted by Le Cabinet de Relations Publiques National. It was an important moment of reconciliation nonetheless.

    Hmmm. Don’t know about that. Would you like to talk to present-day residents in Zimbabwe, about the successful “separatist” movement there with Mugabe?

    Seriously, to put Quebec on the same level as an African nation/ people is to not deal seriously with history and to obscure the situation through emotional blackmail. Huhhuh, Quebecois, who “look white” are visibly to be distinguished from “Anglos” who look white.

    Bad argument. Bad analogy. Bad logic.

    Find somethging else but not this colonialism b.s.

    Michel

    January 12, 2010 at 8:18 pm

  23. Gotta laugh.

    You guys are discussing Wal-Mart, a fuc$&*% U.S. company, you know, ANGLO.

    And you’re excusing them.

    Not only that, you’ve got idiots here touting “libertarian” economics, “Anglo” economics, without batting an eyelash.

    Talk about contradictions.

    So…you guys just want to make money, just like the “Anglos”, and that’s it. Except you want to speak French while doing it.

    The money don’t care what language it’s being earned in. It don’t care who spends it.

    In other words, you’ve just abandoned any real rationale for any culture, any language, anything except money.

    Ayn Rand was Russian, wrote in English. Total idiot.

    It isn’t separatism that’s being discussed here. Only money.

    Michel

    January 12, 2010 at 8:27 pm

  24. is there any other cultural mystery you’d like to share or are you going to give us an adress as to where to send a cheque?

    perhaps you would like any $$$$$$$$$$ to be re-directed to bombardier?

    my culture is my culture and if you don’t like it – ignore it or propose something better – it’s your choice – your liberty – your soul.

    to call any rand an idiot is…. what?

    E_A_S_Y ou F_A_C_I_L_E?

    johnnyonline

    January 12, 2010 at 8:50 pm

  25. I once read somewhere that Cecil Rhodes at one point in his life learned to speak functionally one of the Nguni languages, perhaps isiZulu. I don’t remember my source so I have nowhere to confirm this, although I do know that it is traditional among the Anglos of rural Natal (Rhodes was one, briefly) to learn isiZulu.

    littlerob

    January 12, 2010 at 9:19 pm

  26. if, in fact true, i am not surprised littlerob.

    his leetle grey cell (apologies to hercule poirot AND agathe) are working bien non?

    johnnyonline

    January 12, 2010 at 10:00 pm

  27. “all those individuals being taken advantage of would be where the vast majority of the planet was 200 years ago – starving, living in squalor with disease and with virtually no chance of improvement”

    Wow I had no idea Walmart was responsible for modern agriculture, antibiotics and vaccinations too.

    It sure is fortunate that Louis Pasteur and Alexander Fleming were able to run to their local Walmart for glassware and lab chemicals.

    Edvaard

    January 12, 2010 at 11:01 pm

  28. ednik,

    there was never any wal-mart in france – pasteur got the test tubes at super u.

    fleming (like me) had developed resistance to the large chains and purchased all petri dishes at the local apothecary.

    tangential to this was the “feel good” decision of banning ddt for 40 years resulting in the deaths of an estimated 40 million children from malaria.

    did you ever read any rachel carson? did you ever think al gore would get a nobel prize for making a bogus movie? is tilting at wal-mart without a safety helmet an approved windmill activity?

    johnnyonline

    January 13, 2010 at 5:05 am

  29. Tilting at Walmart… perhaps guilty as charged,

    but I fail to see the link to Silent Spring. It’s pure Donqui Xite.

    Edward

    January 13, 2010 at 9:44 pm

  30. You’re all worked up about this, John-Quixote.
    Take two thalidomide and call me in the morning.

    Edward

    January 13, 2010 at 9:47 pm


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