AngryFrenchGuy

The Ignoble Character Assassination of Louise Harel

with 248 comments

parti-quebecois-accuse-de-racisme

“If we go from 19 to 10 boroughs, but these boroughs remain quasi-municipalities as they are now, we will end up in the worst of situations because we’ll have cities … an Italian city, a Haitian city, an anglophone city, an Arab city – Ville St. Laurent, a Jewish city, etc. We will no longer have this sense of one big city with boroughs that speaks with one voice.”

Louise Harel


I don’t care if you agree or not with the characterization of Ville-Saint-Laurent as an “Arab City” or if you feel that describing other Montreal boroughs as Haitian, Italian and Jewish is a bit of an oversimplification.  There is no way you or anyone in good faith that thinks former municipal affairs minister Louise Harel meant anything offensive when she said the above on RDI last week.

Everyone very well understood that she was speaking out against ghettos and division and for a more diverse, multicultural and united city.

To imply anything else is bullshit.  It is another example of the ignoble character assassination The Montreal Gazette and Québec federalists are willing to perform on anyone who has ever been associated with the Parti québécois.  It is spreading lies, it is sewing the seeds of hate, it is one more desperate attempt to create ethnic division for political purposes.

To find the appropriately outraged quotes to give credibility to its malicious interpretation of Louise Harel’s quote, the Gazette turned to a Montreal imam who favours the implementation of Charia Law in Québec and one, two, three members of Mayor Gérald Tremblay’s Union Montréal party.

Oh yeah, Madame Harel is rumoured to be thinking about running for mayor in the next municipal election.  Do you think this has anything to do with it?

Robert Libman, a former mayor of Côte-Saint-Luc, leader of the Equality Party and member of Mayor Tremblay’s party accused Louise Harel of  “sowing the seeds of xenophobia by pointing to identifiable communities.  It’s as if she sees bogeymen in everything that is not white and francophone.”

Hey Robert?  Wanna know how your own electors identify your city?  And by the way, for those who don’t know, Robert Libman is the former president of the Québec chapter of B’nai Brith, an organization so open to non whites and francophones that it actively campaigned for a separate network of publicly financed Jewish Schools in Québec.

Tony Sciascia, president of the Italian Canadian Congress, Quebec region, was also offended by Harel’s characterization of some boroughs as Italian.  Wanna know how the kids of St.Leonard see their own city?

How far up their asses are these people’s heads?

After reading that Harel called his borough, Ville Saint-Laurent an “Arab City”, Alan DaSousa said: “I don’t think it’s appropriate for our community to be dissed in such a cavalier fashion”

Care to explain how being called an Arab is a diss, Alan?  Really?  I understand you are not an Arab and that Ville Saint-Laurent is more diverse that Harel implied.  But what do you mean when you say being called Arab is a diss?

Montréal municipal politics have always been an upside down mirror of provincial politics: those associated with sovereignty movement usually in favour of a strong centralized metropolis and the federalist are the ones pleading for a very loose confederation of independent municipalities.

The only thing that doesn’t change is the willingness of the latter to use hate, lies and slander in their pathetic attempts to drive a wedge between francophones and other communities.

Written by angryfrenchguy

March 13, 2009 at 9:19 pm

248 Responses

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  1. You fail to mention that the English (Anglo) education system has been “cleansed” to the point of ‘almost extinction’. You make it sound like you and yours are doing the English Quebeck community a favor or something!! Our social services and hospitals have been “cleansed” to near extinction in the city. And on the South Shore of Montreal (10 min. from downtown Mtl.,) in places like Brossard, Saint Lambert, Saint Hubert, Longueuil – with Greenfield Park,49.5% anglo population there is NOT ONE English Clinic – NOT ONE social service office – not ONE English paper or media outlet… They’ve all been cleansed out of the area!! Charles LeMoyne Hospital in Greenfield Park is a Separatist bastien that has a reputation of discriminating against English and non francophone patients bar none!!! And again that’s in an English town!! As for English employees in that hospital – I doubt you’ll find one!!
    As for “..they have nothing to envy Francopnes of other Provinces”.. I beg to differ!!! In Ontario alone there are more than 600 French Schools for a Franco population of less than 200,000… while in Quebec I doubt there are more than 15 English schools left!! And add to that that most “English Schools” are French immersion.. And that is for a population of over 2,000,000 English speaking people! Our schools have been CLEANSED!!!

    You may be fine with the Charter of the French language. Most bigots would be. But how about the Charter of Rights!!! That has been stolen from non francophone Quebeckers!

    As for assimilation of Francophones in the other provinces!! Give me a break!! Canada has been made Bilingual to please the Francophone.. and I’ve lost count of the number of French schools across the country. The language has done nothing but flourish and grow in Canada. They have even accepted a Federal Political party that is determined to break up the country. In other countries they’d be arrested for treason!
    It’s only in Quebec that racism and ethnic cleansing of a culture is not only allowed but encouraged.

    Didi

    March 21, 2009 at 6:57 pm

  2. When was that pray tell? Quebec has always been unilingual French except for downtown and western Montreal. Eastern Montreal and the rest of the bloody province has always been French! To use this myth and outright lie of the “Yes Sir…” is nothing but bullshit and you know it. The Royal Bank President way back in 1030 was French. Every Premier except for one.. has been French! Every mayor except for the odd one or two … has been French! So what the hell are you talking about?

    Or are you talking about the English industrialists and business owners – who poured their hearts and souls into building their businesses with their OWN money, blood sweat and tears.. were not supposed to speak in English in the businesses they built and gave jobs to everyone!! Well you’re way off the mark buddy! The ONLY Employers in the Province who discriminated were the French ones.. then and now!
    If you’re going to spouot days of yore… have the decency to tell the truth. it would be good for your soul!

    Didi

    March 21, 2009 at 7:06 pm

  3. You lie monsieur.
    Quebec anglos today have the highest rate of unemployment.. (because they are being STARVED out of the workforce). They do NOT have the same legal rights as Francophone citizens of Quebec. They have had their language and culture (ergo the right to make a living -live equally – in harmony and freedom) removed!

    And I would dearly love to hear just what priviliges they have that most other Quebeckers enjoy??? If they do it’s a big secret that no one knows about and I’d sure as hell love to take advantage of them. So how about listing them?

    Look fella, the whole world is finding out about Quebec’s ethnic cleansing. Too many have visited here, moved here (and left – oftentimes as fast as they could) for it to remain Canada’s and Quebec’s dirty little secret.

    Didi

    March 21, 2009 at 7:14 pm

  4. Bravo!!!!!!!!!!!

    Didi

    March 21, 2009 at 7:15 pm

  5. Did you know that when Louise Marois was Minister of education, she abolished the correction of spelling?
    She claimed it stifled creativity!

    I guess she never heard of Tolstoy or Dickens or any of the other greats, They all learned to spell – didn’t stifle them any.

    Didi

    March 21, 2009 at 7:19 pm

  6. To angryphone:

    I won’t address your whole piece – it would take pages to correct your misleading comments. I did want you to know that re: your Robert Libman remarks. I find it interesting that you infer that being Jewish is non white and non francophone. You must know that there are Jews of every race and color throughout the world including Quebec! In calling for the financing of Jewish schools it’s because it’s a religion – like Catholic (and French Catholic that discriminated against English Quebecers like crazy) and wouldn’t allow the “English devils in their schools!).
    I find your comment very anti Semitic – but then again, given all the pro separatists and FLQ graffetti sprayed all over Jewish tombstones, which were then overturned and desecrated.. I’m not surprised.

    Didi

    March 21, 2009 at 7:29 pm

  7. I didn’t get a direct response from you, ACJ. Just some rhetoric about the others and the good old days. Might this have been before all the business took the 401 prior to 1995.

    abp

    March 22, 2009 at 12:17 am

  8. I wonder though, if any of the other areas have government sponsored ‘language cops’ running around ready to leap on retailers – or individuals – that dare to put up ‘bilingual signs’,
    From what I read in the language laws, French should be prominent… no where did I read it must be twice the size of English and yet all hell breaks loose if it’s not. They harrass and fine people with a frenzy that is beyond belief. Often times based on one complaint.
    And yet if tens of thousands of anglos complain over the discrimination nothing is done, other than labeling them anglo extremists.
    The world must be told what’s going on in Quebec.

    Didi

    March 22, 2009 at 10:51 am

  9. Please note: I made a type.. in my post below re: President of Royal Bank – it was 1930..

    Mentioned that to correct the LIES that French Canadians were ‘deprived’ of management roles by the English devils.. By the way, have many many examples if you need em.

    Didi

    March 22, 2009 at 11:07 am

  10. “Greenfield Park,49.5% anglo population there is NOT ONE English Clinic”

    “And that is for a population of over 2,000,000 English speaking people!”

    Greenfield Park half anglo? In 2009?

    2 million anglos in Greater Montreal? In 2009?

    Geez, I am glad you are not my accountant!

    Acajack

    March 22, 2009 at 7:11 pm

  11. Didi: “The Royal Bank President way back in 1030 was French. Every Premier except for one.. has been French! Every mayor except for the odd one or two … has been French! So what the hell are you talking about?”

    The Royal Bank of Canada has never been headed up by a francophone in its history. Not in 1930. Not ever.

    Neither has the Bank of Montreal, bor I believe any of the other large Canadian banks except the National Bank of Canada (formerly the Provincial Bank). The Caisses populaires don’t count as bank.

    This in spite of the fact that the Royal, CIBC and BMO were all founded in Montreal I believe.

    There have been two anglo premiers in the history of Quebec: John Ross and Edmund Flynn. Daniel Johnson Sr. and Jean Charest were/are both half and half but just to be nice I will let you count these as francophones.

    And there have been at least a dozen anglo mayors during the history of the City of Montreal.

    This is almost too easy. Don’t you even check anything before you dish out this hallucinatory crap, Didi?

    Acajack

    March 22, 2009 at 7:22 pm

  12. “Look fella, the whole world is finding out about Quebec’s ethnic cleansing. Too many have visited here, moved here (and left – oftentimes as fast as they could) for it to remain Canada’s and Quebec’s dirty little secret.”

    If you really knew what ethnic cleansing was, you won’t be throwing around the term so loosely.

    Acajack

    March 22, 2009 at 7:23 pm

  13. I don’t want independence as you know.

    All I want is for Canada to have a more effective and realistic language policy with respect to its francophone population.

    Acajack

    March 22, 2009 at 7:30 pm

  14. Didi: “You fail to mention that the English (Anglo) education system has been “cleansed” to the point of ‘almost extinction’.”

    Extinction? Enrolment in the anglo school system is actually increasing at the moment whereas the francophone system is declining. This information is easy to find by Googling a few key words – it’s been widely covered by the media.

    Acajack

    March 22, 2009 at 8:00 pm

  15. Didi: “You lie monsieur. Quebec anglos today have the highest rate of unemployment..”

    There are several groups in Quebec that have much higher rates of unemployment than anglos (immigrants, aboriginals, etc.). In any event, I didn’t talk about unemployment but of socio-economic attainment, which includes average income, education levels, personal wealth, etc. You can take one statistic in isolation (and note that anglos’ unemployment is not that much higher than francophones’) to prove your point, but when one looks at the overall picture anglos in Quebec are still on top of the heap socio-economically, more than 30 years after the passage of Bill 101.

    “(because they are being STARVED out of the workforce)”

    Omigod. Somebody call an ambulance! Didi! Seek help before it’s too late!

    Acajack

    March 22, 2009 at 8:04 pm

  16. “From what I read in the language laws, French should be prominent… no where did I read it must be twice the size of English and yet all hell breaks loose if it’s not.”

    Then I guess you haven’t really read the law carefully enough:

    2. Lorsque les textes rédigés à la fois en français et dans une autre langue sont sur une même affiche, le texte rédigé en français est réputé avoir un impact visuel beaucoup plus important si les conditions suivantes sont réunies :

    1 – l’espace consacré au texte rédigé en français est au moins deux fois plus grand que celui consacré au texte rédigé dans l’autre langue;

    2 – les caractères utilisés dans le texte rédigé en français sont au moins deux fois plus grands que ceux utilisés dans le texte rédigé dans l’autre langue;

    Acajack

    March 22, 2009 at 8:09 pm

  17. “I wonder though, if any of the other areas have government sponsored ‘language cops’ running around ready to leap on retailers – or individuals – that dare to put up ‘bilingual signs’,”

    You’re right, they don’t. Instead, they just eliminate all institutions operating in the minority language (that’s when they were being nice), which effectively reduces the minority language population to near-extinct status.

    After that, presto!, with a generation or two there is hardly anyone left to post signs in the minority language, or to demand signage or service in it.

    Acajack

    March 22, 2009 at 8:12 pm

  18. @ ACJ,

    What form of realistic language policy would you like to see. We already have the OLA which has proven to be an abysmal failure. Perhaps “loi 101” partout en Canada?? I doubt that would be popular. As you well know, in Quebec the french are the majority ( and there is nothing wrong with that) but in Canada the french are a minority. Seems to me Quebec plays both cards well, having 101,104 in Quebec ( to disciminate against anglos-comme le pauvre petit homme Kyle W de NDG) whilst at the same time demanding french services and recognition across the nation!! Unilingual Quebec and bilingual Canada. Odd, is it not, when most of the bilinguals come from Quebec.

    As contrary to what you have said, ACJ…it is Quebec who wants the cake, the icing and the creme de glace, all on their plate.

    abp

    March 23, 2009 at 12:53 am

  19. > There have been two anglo premiers in the history of Quebec: John Ross
    > and Edmund Flynn.

    It may be more complicated than this. John Jones Ross was the son of a Scottish father and a French-Canadian mother, and while I don’t know if his first language was French or English or both, he studied in the Petit Séminaire de Québec and was apparently “[s]een as a “French representative” by both English- and French-speaking Canadians” (source the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online). On the other hand he was a staunch Conservative (and Catholic) and his support of the government during the Riel Affair apparently led to his political downfall, so he wasn’t really a typical French-Canadian nationalist of the time.

    As for Edmund James Flynn, according to this same source, he apparently was anglophone, but also fluently bilingual, he studied in French-language institutions (the Séminaire de Québec and Laval University) and married francophone women. So I’d say he’s also somewhat “between” anglophone and francophone.

    Another interesting example is Félix-Gabriel Marchand, whose first language was actually English and who only learned French at age 11 according to Wikipedia. He still ended up fluently bilingual, but I think we may count him as anglophone.

    > This is almost too easy. Don’t you even check anything before you
    > dish out this hallucinatory crap, Didi?

    I think it’s obvious that he doesn’t. I’m suspecting he’s a troll who doesn’t actually really believe what he says, but he seems to be spending quite some time writing it. (Or maybe not: writing is faster when you’re not trying to make sense.) I mean, “The world must be told what’s going on in Quebec.” So ominous, I’m convinced! And here I was worrying about Darfur.

    Marc

    March 23, 2009 at 12:58 am

  20. “It may be more complicated than this. John Jones Ross was the son of a Scottish father and a French-Canadian mother, and while I don’t know if his first language was French or English or both, he studied in the Petit Séminaire de Québec and was apparently “[s]een as a “French representative” by both English- and French-speaking Canadians” (source the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online). On the other hand he was a staunch Conservative (and Catholic) and his support of the government during the Riel Affair apparently led to his political downfall, so he wasn’t really a typical French-Canadian nationalist of the time.
    As for Edmund James Flynn, according to this same source, he apparently was anglophone, but also fluently bilingual, he studied in French-language institutions (the Séminaire de Québec and Laval University) and married francophone women. So I’d say he’s also somewhat “between” anglophone and francophone.
    Another interesting example is Félix-Gabriel Marchand, whose first language was actually English and who only learned French at age 11 according to Wikipedia. He still ended up fluently bilingual, but I think we may count him as anglophone.”

    Good insight Marc. So I guess we could say, if we threw in Daniel Johnson Sr. and Jean Charest, that there are there have been five Quebec premiers who were “half-and-half” at best: Flynn, Ross, Marchand, Johnson Sr. and Charest. This is not surprising, and actually not that bad, when one considers that up until the 1970s, the percentage of Quebec anglos who could speak French was only around 25%, which doesn’t exactly make one of the community very likely to become premier of a mainly francophone province when you have to speak to that electorate.

    Also interesting to note is that up until the 1960s, it was a given that the Minister of Finance post in the Quebec government was always held by an anglo. This tradition had gone on virtually uninterrupted since Confederation.

    Acajack

    March 23, 2009 at 8:15 am

  21. “@ ACJ,

    What form of realistic language policy would you like to see. We already have the OLA which has proven to be an abysmal failure. Perhaps “loi 101″ partout en Canada?? I doubt that would be popular. As you well know, in Quebec the french are the majority ( and there is nothing wrong with that) but in Canada the french are a minority. Seems to me Quebec plays both cards well, having 101,104 in Quebec ( to disciminate against anglos-comme le pauvre petit homme Kyle W de NDG) whilst at the same time demanding french services and recognition across the nation!! Unilingual Quebec and bilingual Canada. Odd, is it not, when most of the bilinguals come from Quebec.

    As contrary to what you have said, ACJ…it is Quebec who wants the cake, the icing and the creme de glace, all on their plate.”

    ABP dear, it is difficult to take your questions seriously when you pepper your posts with absurdities like Quebec wanting Bill 101 across Canada…

    That said and more seriously, I don’t profess to have all the answers, and certainly a retooling of the linguistic framework would require much more study than just off-the-top-off-our-heads brainstorming like we do here.

    But it is obvious that the current set of policies is not pleasing to the vast majority of Canadians, both inside and outside Quebec. And no matter what some people say, much of our unity crises does stem from this problem. So it should be fixed, or at least an honest attempt should be made to fix it.

    Acajack

    March 23, 2009 at 8:25 am

  22. > Also interesting to note is that up until the 1960s, it was a given that the
    > Minister of Finance post in the Quebec government was always held by an
    > anglo. This tradition had gone on virtually uninterrupted since Confederation.

    I remember watching the Duplessis television series (with Jean Lapointe in the title role) and seeing Duplessis make a big deal about his new Finance minister being a French-Canadian. (Looking around, I find it was probably Onésime Gagnon who held this job from 1944 to 1958.)

    Marc

    March 23, 2009 at 1:01 pm

  23. “ABP dear, it is difficult to take your questions seriously when you pepper your posts with absurdities like Quebec wanting Bill 101 across Canada…”

    What, you didn’t appreciate the sarcasm :) One has to wonder, however, how far one group will bend to appease the other.

    “And no matter what some people say, much of our unity crises does stem from this problem.”
    “So it should be fixed, or at least an honest attempt should be made to fix it.”

    Yes, I would agree that language is likely the major issue. The politicians with their learned advisors have attempted to “fix” this situation for the past several decades and nothing has changed and the debate rolls on. It could be argued that some of their measures have actually produced more division and discontent. Perhaps its time to admit that the situation may never be resolved and move on with new methodology.

    Good fences in most cases make good neighbors and this is likely the case here, considering the current and historical differences existing between Quebec and Canada. Some argue that Quebec has already left the house and just hasn’t gotten around to moving the furniture or issuing a change of address notification.

    ABP

    March 23, 2009 at 2:01 pm

  24. He ACJ,

    On the issue of language being a good part of the problem.

    Check this out if you haven’t already.

    http://www.montrealgazette.com/story_print.html?id=1415294

    ABP

    March 23, 2009 at 2:38 pm

  25. I really do believe people are talking past each other here. You say Canada should have a more realistic and effective language policy, and ABP responds with this “bill 101 across Canada” stuff. Oh yes, he says it’s sarcasm, but then he wonders “how far one group will bend to appease the other.” I don’t think anyone wonders which group is doing the appeasing, in his mind.

    It’s the same thing when I discuss with Bruce. I say that people should recognize that the majority of Quebecers have decided that French would be the common and official language of Quebec and the language in which to integrate immigrants. What I get in response is a bunch of stuff about how he values so much the francophone culture in Canada, how he tries to learn all about it, how he sends his children to French schools and tries to create an interest for francophone culture in them as well, etc. Well, yes, I don’t doubt any of this, but that’s not really what I’m talking about.

    I’ve heard before that many anglophone Canadians think they’ve done as much as they could do — and possibly too much — in terms of language policy by making French an official language of Canada, officially equal to English. And maybe they’re right, I don’t know. But why do they seem to have trouble understanding that we’re talking about language policy in Quebec and not across Canada? Is it so difficult to conceive of a Canada where official language and the policies regarding it varies from province to province? Especially since that’s already what we have.

    So no, of course Quebec doesn’t want bill 101 across Canada. Nor does it want an unilingual Quebec and a bilingual (rest of) Canada. But many anglophone Canadians seem to want a bilingual Quebec in a “bilingual” Canada.

    Marc

    March 23, 2009 at 3:18 pm

  26. Acajack,

    Yes you’re right. I meant to write Bank of Montreal, so forgive me error. But you are very mistaken about the Bank of Montreal mon ami, and with the others you mention. I will start with the Bank Of Montreal: So who is hallucinating here?

    Austin Cuvillier (August 20, 1779 – July 11, 1849) was a businessman and political figure in Lower Canada and Canada East.

    He was born Augustin Cuvillier in Quebec City in 1779 and was hired by a Montreal auctioneer, eventually taking over the business when his employer retired.

    During the War of 1812, he served with the militia. In 1814, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada representing Huntingdon County, as a member of the Parti canadien. He played an important role in the founding of the Bank of Montreal and was one of its first directors. He also helped found the Montreal Fire Insurance Company and became president in 1820. In 1821, he was part of a commission negotiating the sharing of customs duties between Lower and Upper Canada. He opposed the union of the two Canadas. In 1828, he helped present petitions against Governor Dalhousie’s policies in London. In 1829, he began to distance himself from the Parti patriote. He opposed the Ninety-Two Resolutions that were presented in 1834. By 1836, he was one of the most important auctioneers in Montreal and served as president on the city’s Committee of Trade, later the Montreal Board of Trade. He commanded a battalion in the militia during the Lower Canada Rebellion.

    In 1841, he was elected to the 1st Parliament of the Province of Canada representing Huntingdon and was elected speaker. In 1844, he defended Governor Charles Theophilus Metcalfe against the Reformers when the governor wished to retain exclusive control over patronage. This led to the end of his political career and Cuvillier returned to his auction business.

    He died of typhus at Montreal in 1849.

    Didi

    April 4, 2009 at 6:13 pm

  27. LOL Anglo enrollment is increasing for the FIRST TIME in 35 YEARS and that’s by a hundred or so students.
    That’s why it made the news! That’s AFTER 90% of our schools have been closed!! So the point you are trying to make is about as skewed as I’ve seen in a long time lol. And I said to the POINT of Almost Extinction. Almost extinction meaning – there are still a FEW schools left… but the government is still trying its best to make sure the ‘language laws’ take care of that annoying problem..isn’t it.

    Here’s a copy of the Language Laws and tell me if you see a pattern of wiping out the English language or not. And tell me if you’ve ever seen anything as biased and bigoted in any other North American or democratic country in the free world. By the way I will make little notes throughout the document highlighted with *** to make clear what is ACTUALLY happening or in other words… how those laws are being violated on a daily basis with government approval!!

    Systematization of the Content Of the Language Laws of Quebec [December 1998]
    Claude Bélanger,
    Department of History,
    Marianopolis College
    Listed below, and broken into various categories according to the linguistic requirements, are the linguistic prescriptions as per the various language laws as they applied in Quebec in 1998. The requirements are into categories; the number listed after the requirement indicates the article that spells out this requirement. All the articles are from Bill 101 [or the regulations issued under its authority] unless specified otherwise. While a serious attempt has been made to be accurate and complete here, please refer directly to the applicable laws and regulations for legal information and decisions. The categories used here and the marginal numbering are my own and do not appear in the laws.
    Part One
    French as a Fundamental Right in Quebec
    F-1 French is the official language of Quebec [1]

    ***** So English is NO Longer recognized as an Official language in Quebec *****

    F-2 All individuals have a right to be communicated with in French; this applies to the Public Administration, health and social services, public utilities, professional corporations, trade unions and enterprises exercising their business in Quebec [2]
    F-3 During the deliberations at a public meeting, anyone has the right to speak in French [3]
    F-4 All have the right to work in French [4]
    F-5 Consumers of goods and services have the right to be informed and served in French [5]
    F-6 Anyone has the right to go to school in French [6]
    F-7 It is forbidden to an employer to layoff, fire, demote or replace an employee for the single reason that the employee only speaks French or that there is not sufficient knowledge of another language or that this employee has demanded the respect of rights as outlined in the language laws.

    ****** so if an employer needs bilingual staff in order to stay in business he either has to hire extra people and if he/she can’t afford the added expense – then tough shit. Bear in mind… the law DOES NOT MENTION that All have the right to work in English – and it looks like any employer can fire any anglophone for not speaking french… and that’s just fine with the government.. To point out it’s encouraged would be moot *****
    [45]
    F-8 Businesses of more than fifty employees must obtain a certificate of francization [139-140]; businesses of more than one hundred employees must establish a Committee of francization [136]; the aim of francization programmes is to generalise the use of French at all levels of the enterprises of Quebec

    ******* Nice and clear there.. It’s the governments PLAN too wipe English out of the workplace in Quebec **********
    [141]
    Part Two
    Categories of Specific Language Requirements
    Category 1 – Situations where only French may be used
    1.1 Name used to designate the Government of Quebec, its department or ministries as well as organisms of the Public Administration [14]
    1.2 Written communication from the Government of Quebec to other governments and to all corporate bodies [16]
    1.3 All written communications between the various departments of the government of Quebec [17]
    1.4 All advertising signs from the Government of Quebec [22]; for exceptions, see 4.2
    1.5 All road signs [22]; pictograms may be used as well

    **** Note that road signs like hazards directions etc.. must be in French… Anglos have to figure out what the pictograms mean. English tourists?… tough shit *****
    1.6 The name of all professional corporations registered in Quebec [34]

    ***** Can’t have a professional corporation registered in both languages… nope… can’t have any English titles or translations… nope. Get rid of that English !! ********
    1.7 Public signs and advertising for commercial purposes outside of buildings, inside a shopping centre, on public transport vehicles, of businesses of more than 50 employees and of certain franchises [regulations issued under s.58]

    **** Only francophones can benefit from public signs.
    F…k the English ***
    Category 2 – Situations where French and English are required
    2.1 Proposed bills, laws and regulations of the Government of Quebec [article 133 of the Constitution Act 1867; s.7 of bill 101]; both texts are equally authoritative [7]

    **** LOL… problem with that requirement is… most often when one tries to find the English version… a note pops up saying English version coming soon…
    Some have been there for over 30 years… Still waiting LOL… ****
    2.2 Health services in designated anglophone establishments [Bill 142]

    ***** That means… not in any south shore clinics or hospitals and only in a couple of English Hospitals left on the island of Montreal. So if one gets sick, like my 84 year old mother… and the doctor decides he won’t or can’t speak English – which has happened too many times to count… then tough shit again ***** Please note: Anglos pay the SAME TAXES and there are still over 2 million English speaking Quebeckers!! But they don’t count!!

    Category 3 – Situations where French or English may be used (choice)
    3.1 Pleading before the Courts of Quebec [Section 133 of the Constitution Act 1867; s.7.4 of bill 101]

    **** Note the term ‘May be used’. But if the judge says I don’t speak English… then another tough shit applies ****

    3.2 Clinical dossiers of social or health services [27]; these must be supplied in French if requested to do so by a person authorised to obtain them [27]

    **** Good luck getting English dossiers of social or health services… Note again.. they MUST be supplied to francophones.. ******
    Category 4 – Situations where French and another language may be used (French is mandatory but another language, English for example, may be used as well)
    4.1 Signs erected by the Government if health and public security require it [22]

    **** See note above *****

    4.2 Services offered by municipalities, school boards, social and health bodies if dispensing these services to persons in majority speaking another language [29.1]

    ***** See note above *****
    4.3 Signs erected by the establishments described under 4.2 [24]
    4.4 Internal communications, communications between two people in the public administration and the name of the organisations falling under 29.1 (this applies to work related matters and not to private conversations); [26]

    will continue the rest another time. I think anyone reading this will ‘get the drift’

    Didi

    April 4, 2009 at 7:01 pm

  28. I will list the percentage of anglophones working in most Quebec Federal, Provincial, corporate, Public corps like Hydro, municipalities etc… 1 – 2 %
    That is one to two percent! In many cases O%. That means NONE.

    So bugger off.

    Didi

    April 4, 2009 at 7:04 pm

  29. […] Because if race baiting does not help build nations, it has been a very successful way of winning elections.  Mr. Sabia’s answer was straight out of the Liberal (Mr. Sabia is a known contributor) playbook which says that every issue must be spined into a question of ethnicity. […]

  30. what she really meant to say was “we no longer have this sense of one big FRENCH city with boroughs that speaks with one French voice”

    elisabeth

    October 11, 2009 at 11:15 am


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