AngryFrenchGuy

English is Back in the Québec Workplace

with 288 comments

anglo exodus montreal

“I just love Montreal”, I overheard a lady tell her friend in Avenue Video in Montréal.  “I’d live here if I spoke French.”

“I don’t speak French”, scoffed a passerby.  “Don’t worry about that.”

English is getting stronger in Montreal.  I’m not the one saying it.  The Montreal Gazette is saying it.  There’s just no way around the numbers.  Québec’s English-speaking population rose by 5.5% between 2001 and 2006 according to StatsCan.

How did this happen?

“The easy answer to the question of why young anglos aren’t leaving Quebec like they did a generation ago”, writes David Johnston, “is that they speak better French, and aren’t being chased away by political uncertainty.”

You will all remember that the “political uncertainty” started in the 1950’s and 1960’s when francophones started asking why they were paid less than any other nationality in Québec, why no francophones held any management position in Canada’s banking and finance industry and why they were forbidden to use their language to speak to each on the shop floor.

English-Canada’s business elite responded by moving the country’s entire financial sector and 800 000 jobs from Montreal to Ontario where discrimination against French-speakers was allowed.

But a more important reason, according to the Montreal edition of the Winnipeg Free Press, is that it’s getting easier and easier for English-speakers to live and work in Montreal because there has been a “cultural shift” that has made English “acceptable” in the workplace.

“By the 1990s”, continues our man,  “speaking English had become more acceptable in Quebec as firms came to see the need to improve the capacity of their workforces to operate in English. This created new opportunities for anglophones.”

As if English had ever disappeared from the Québec workplace!  As if the French-speaking majority of Québec that had been forced to work in English for 250 years suddenly found itself unable to communicate with the outside world in the international language of business after bill 101 gave them the right to work in French!

The failure of Bill 101

When I was a truck driver satellites communications between French-speaking drivers and French-speaking dispatchers had to be in English so the English-speaking security team in Toronto could understand what was going on.

In 2005 the Metro chain of grocery stores bought A&P Canada and Christian Haub, the CEO and chairman of the board of A&P got a seat on the Québec company’s board.  Thirteen Francophones and one Anglo.  Guess what language the board meeting are in now?

Yep.  Even when the French businessmen win, they lose.

That’s the way the modern workplace functions.  It is entirely structured around the needs of the less qualified people.  French-speakers in Québec, and all non-English speaking people around the world, are required to acquire additional language skills so that unilingual Anglos won’t have to.

Québec briefly tried to change that with the Charter of the French language, but the truth is that the rules that were supposed to protect the right of Québec workers to work in their language are broken.  They don’t work anymore.

They were designed for businesses that could be contained in a building, to make sure that the 15th floor would communicate in French with the 6th and 2nd floor, all the way down to the shop floor.

But businesses don’t work like that anymore.  Management is in Toronto, accounting’s in Alberta and IT is in Bangalore.  Toronto’s and New York’s business culture is once again being imposed on the workers of Québec, and the entire world, actually.

Québec’s workforce has always been the most multilingual in Canada, and probably one of the most linguistically versatile in the World.  Québec’s business culture did not change, it’s the world’s business structure that changed.

And once again, after only a brief interruption, unilingual Anglos can come back to work in Montreal.

And just in time, as the stellar generation of brilliant financial minds that left Montreal a generation ago have now managed to completely scrap Ontario’s economy and is now ready to come back home.

Written by angryfrenchguy

February 1, 2009 at 12:29 pm

288 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. antonio,

    in my quebec, all societies are respected big or small, la politique laïque is realistically the favourite flavour – and men or women do what they’ve done for a very long time without somebody telling them what’s equal.

    johnnyonline

    February 6, 2009 at 11:35 pm

  2. “The only restrictions are that you must respect the French-speaking society, separation of church and state, and respect the equality of men and women.”

    This sounds entirely reasonable. But when you use the word “respect” you really mean “adopt”. For example, I can respect your viewpoint without necessarily having to agree with you. That is not how you mean it though when you say respect French-speaking society etc…. Why isn’t respect MUTUAL?

    Shouldn’t it be enough that I don’t impede you from living as you please. Why do I have to change…. This has always been the irony of the term “reasonable accommodation”. It is neither reasonable nor accommodation.

    fast eddy

    February 6, 2009 at 11:38 pm

  3. Antoine: “I can’t imagine any such competence that the provinces could not do as well or better than at the federal level. ”

    Then perhaps the level of municipality is even better! Let’s do away with Quebec and create a federal republic of townships. Return to the good old days of city-states.

    I would turn your argument on its head: Anything that is best done by the collective (health insurance, defense, trade, funding of research, bank regulation) is done better by a larger collective than by the smaller group. You spread the risk more uniformly and draw from a larger pool of funds so that the most talented individuals can compete for more resources than would otherwise be available to them in a small group.

    fast eddy

    February 6, 2009 at 11:46 pm

  4. “This conflict between the federal and provincial governments is one of the fiscal arguments for the independence of Quebec.”

    it is not only quebec that finds the dynamic leaves a bad taste in the mouth. quebec is the loudest voice among many. quebec leads in this regard. alberta watches and listens closely. the west’s toes have been stepped on by ottawa a number of times too.

    johnnyonline

    February 6, 2009 at 11:58 pm

  5. One horse has strength…a team of horses is colletively much more stronger…as long as they pull in the same direction and all bare the burden equally and receive proportionate rations of oats.

    ABP

    abp

    February 7, 2009 at 12:18 am

  6. “the west’s toes have been stepped on by ottawa a number of times too.”

    True, and many more times than others. Have any one of you seen the 1915 cartoon “Milch cow”..cartoon

    Yes, back in 1915, been going on for a long time. Extend this cartoon to the NEP which cost alberta billions.

    Check it out.

    http://www.glenbow.org/exhibitions/online/libhtm/milch.htm

    abp

    abp

    February 7, 2009 at 12:29 am

  7. do we get to eat one?

    hunger is a 6 letter word

    February 7, 2009 at 12:31 am

  8. nice graphic – that’s a keeper.

    johnnyonline

    February 7, 2009 at 12:36 am

  9. Sais pas, Tancrède

    — Qu’est que le point d’avoir un pays où tout le monde veut faire son propre ‘dada’?

    Toujours suspicieux d’autres, les gens indiquent avec leurs doigts si longues et si ‘justes’, la culpabilité ailleurs.

    On cherche des raisons de malfaisance où sont des intentions pures.

    Le Canada cherche à valoriser et à aider tous ses citoyens et citoyennes, n’import qui, n’import où, n’import quoi — leur langue, leur couleur, leurs croyances, leur sexe, leur culture, leur histoire.

    Dans la tolérance nous sommes heureux à célébrer tout ça. Le Québec est une partie importante de cette entente de la citoyeneté.

    Canada cherche le honnête homme, le juste homme, l’homme généreux, la femme juste, la femme égale, la femme libre — Oui, il y a celles qui n’y sont pas, mais la génération de leurs enfants, ça c’est autre chose.

    Oui la démocratie n’etait jamais efficace. Pour ça il faut avoir le ‘Prince’, inspiré de Machiavelli, le lider sans scrupules et sans régrets.

    Pourquoi parler des trahaisons, des humiliations, des indignités, des intrigues fédérales, des scandales toujours pérpétrés contre le Québec par un Canada insoucieux!

    Tout ça ne fera jamais rien de bon!

    L’histoire a coulé son cours, et l’avenir nous attend!

    Tu parles du déclin en Manitoba des parleurs français, à cause du crime contre Riel, sa pendaison injuste en 1885, le loi de 1870 et la manque d’ immigration française vers l’ouest — mais les français ne même pas remplir de nos jours leurs propres nombres en Québec.

    Les Québécois sont longtemps départie pour la dynamisme de la nouvelle angleterre au lieu de peupler plutôt l’Ontario ou s’installer en Manitoba dans la XXe

    C’est compréhensible! Il s’agit de l’argent, pas de “rocket science”!

    Et comment a-t-on valorisé la langue française en nouvelle angleterre? Pas du tout!

    Au moins dans le Canada modèrne on essaye de valoriser le français autant qu’il est possible.

    Ben oui, pis ça coût un peu cher, oui, mais pas grand chose, parce qu’elle est une valeur fondamentale de notre pays. On n’apprend pas l’espagnol dans les écoles primaires canadiennes!

    Quand j’ai des rendez-vous dans mon cabinet avec des enfants et leurs parents, je parle aux enfants en français, et les enfants l’entendent, et ils y sont fasciner, parce qu’il y a devant eux, une personne faisant le respect pour notre autre langue.

    Et leurs parents sont aussi ravis de voir cette fascination dans les visages de leurs enfants, leurs grands sourires, leurs compréhension.

    Et cette expérience quotidienne m’enseigne, m’apprend, m’informe qu’il y a une grande bonne volonté parmi les Ontariens d’icitte envers ta langue. Bien sûr ils ne seront pas capables de la parler avec confiance aucun temps très proche, mais il y a au moins une base dans le Canada, une fondation dans la psyche des gens ordinaires, peut-étre en apposition avec la rhétorique chaude des politiciens, des “talking heads” et les gens du droit extrême.

    Mon ‘enquête quotidienne sur le terrain’ me dit quelquechose plus valable que tous les arguments stériles et puériles dans le monde!

    C’est que les jeunes sont ouverts, optimistes, tolérants et bons, … membres d’une renouvellement de la planete qui peut unifier plutôt que détruire les ententes ici et outremer.

    Parce que la société multiculturelle canadienne est déjà une plus grande réussite.

    Mais on entend dans ce fil, assez souvent que les Québecois n’ont pas l’envie d’avoir le multiculturelisme enfoncé dans leurs gorges. C’est peut-être une forme bienséant de dire qu’on n’accept pas “l’autre” sauf que l’autre deviendrait en avant le “nous”.

    Ça parle un peu d’une sorte de réaction xénophobique, mais puis, à contrecoeur on parle aux gens avec français pas trop mal, (ou pas trop bon!) mais accenté de l’étranger, en anglais! C’est peut-être une petite suréaction.

    Mais la vérité est, pour réussir en intégration sociale, on doit accepter, en avant, ‘l’autre’ comme ‘l’autre’ qu’il est, et enfin, dans son propre bon temps il, ou ses enfants, deviendront une bonne partie de le “nous” français.

    Mais je crois que les Québécois majoritaires déjà savent cette vérité, et ils/elles ne cherchent pas la voie d’exclusion, la stratégie de se renfermer dans une maison “face au nord”, essayant de nier ou ignorer la réalité d’Amérique du nord tandis qu’un Québec très bilingue serait trop trop trop plus fort, plus glorieux, plus dynamique, plus prospéré qu’un Québec presque unilingue français.

    Mais il semble que les indépendantistes préconisent la unilingueisme pour la plupart de la population de crainte que la langue autrement va disparaître.

    Et c’est la plus grand force de la ville de Montréal actuel d’être bilangue. Ici, à Montréal on voit le vrai dynamisme québécois.

    C’est seulement un problème psycologique que quelques’uns entre vous sentent, croient, qu’ils doivent “switcher” en anglais quand un seule anglo entre le dépanneur ou quoiqu’il soit! Mon Dieu! (mais en caractères minuscules.)

    Lâchez-vous,vous-mêmes de faire ça!

    Cela, c’est tellement incroyablement XIXe siècle, qu’on ne peut pas presque souvenir que nous sommes, aujourd’hui, dans le XXIe, dans un Québéc modèrne sur tous les plans!

    Comme Johnny a dit, autre part ici, pour protéger mieux la culture et la langue , et l’influence (leverage) francophone il faut avoir plus de naissances d’origine francophone dans la province. On ne peut pas compter tout à fait sur les immigrants, même avec les “accomodments raisonables” que quelques uns débatent ici et d’autres parts, parcequ’il seront pour toujours beaucoup de différences culturelles, très profondes, quand les nouveaux gens arrivent.

    Les même tensions existent tout part au Canada, mais on s’occupe, comme au Québec, à assiter ces gens à s’installer aussi bien que possible. Leurs contributions événtuelles, bien considérables, viendront tant plus tard.

    Bonne nuit tous, toutes, et à Tancrèdible, que tu est.

    bruce

    February 7, 2009 at 1:36 am

  10. Bruce, les independantistes, dont la plupart parlent plusieurs langues, ne sont pas contre le bilinguisme, le trilinguisme ou le multilinguisme des individus, ils sont contre le fait qu’on ne reconnaisse pas que le francais est la langue commune au Quebec, comme l’anglais est la langue commune au Canada. Parler plusieurs langues est une richesse mais ca n’a rien a voir..faut pas tout melanger..

    midnightjack

    February 7, 2009 at 1:44 am

  11. Antonio,

    Je crois que le Canada reste autant honnête que le Québec lui-même.

    Vous parlez souvent des absurités, par exemple, quand vous dîtes que le gouvernement fédéral est tout à fait inutile. Que de la propagande et de ‘hog wash’

    Un remarque comme ça est bien sot, bien stupide, en effet.

    Canada est un pays merveilleux, duquel vous êtes une partie, malgré vous-même, et malgré vos pensées pour la plupart fautives.

    D’où vient ces émotions qui semblent d’être si empoisonées, si pleine de la méchancété, de la mauvaise humeur et de la méprise, presque haïneuse envers vos concitoyens canadiens?

    Vos affiches démontrent, pour moi au moins, un esprit tout dominé par ses idées fixées, jamais capable de transiger sur aucun point.

    Vos parents ou grands-parents ou les leurs sont venues au Canada je ne sais pas quand, et avaient fait leurs sacrifices ici pour ta génération, et vous détournez votre visage de votre pays. Vos aïeux n’ont pas souffrit au Québec sous la domination anglaise pour 215 ans, mais ils avaient, je suis certain, payé leur propre haut prix pour s’installer ici.

    L’élites du Québec sont francophones. Qu’est-ce que donc votre problème? Le Québec est assez libre que la plupart des gens veulent.

    Ils veulent continuer avec les peréquations et avec leurs droits canadiens. Ils veulent prospérér, Ils veulent collaborer avec nous autres en ROC qui parlons l’anglais.

    Au Canada: un modèl multiculturelle luisant, Médicare, les pensions, le bien-être social, la Chartre des droits humain et des libertés, un taux de la corruption très bas, la découverte du insulin, la diplomacie de Lester Pearson et son appui pour les nations unies, les principes de partager les richesses pour aider les provinces plus faibles, radio-canada, le cbc, le vinyl café le reseau pan-canadien des émissions francaises, nos traditions pour garder le paix, nos grandes institutions scholastiques à travers le pays, la tolérance, le respect pour les cultures du monde, nos grands héros, Tommy Douglas, David Suzuki, Sir William Osler, Frederick Banting, Donnaconna, Champlain, Brulé, Jean Talon, Frontenac, Louis Joseph Papineau, Les Ursulines, Francois-Xavier Garneau, Louis Riel, Wilfred Laurier, Jean Lesage, René Levesque, Sir William Van Horne, David Thompson, Simon Fraser, Lincoln Alexander, Oscar Peterson, Andre Laplante, Measha Brueggergosman, Jean Pelletier, Alexander Galt, Laura Secord, Issac Brock,Adam Beck,Edgerton Ryerson, Mel Hurtig, Angela Hewitt, Glenn Gould, Camille Laurin, Maher Arar, Peter Mansbridge, Steven Lewis, Alice Munro, Yves Deschamps, Cornelius Krieghoff, Paul Kane, Clarence Gagnon, Suzor Coté, antoine Plamondon, Richard Monette, William Hutt, Martha Henry, Haroon Siddiqui, …Margaret Lawrence, Yann Martel, Rohinton Mistry, Michael Ondaatje, Celia Franca and the National Ballet of Canada, National Ballet Cie of Winnipeg, les Grands Ballets Canadiens, Le Cirque Soleil, Norman Bethune, A.Y. Jackson, Lawren Harris, Carmichael, A.J. Casson, J.E.H. Macdonald Tom Thomson, Arthur Lismer (the group of seven, Emily Carr, Bill Reid and the other west coast Haida artists of the coast and Queen Charlottes, Lucy Maud Montgomery, Roch Carrier, Michel Tremblay, Paul Borduas, Elvis Stoiko, Alexandre Despatie, Patrick Chan, Marilyn Bell, Cindy Nicholas, Kyle Shewchuk, Victor Davis, Vicki Keith, Rick Mercer,
    Angela Chan, Ian Mohansing, Peter Gzowski, Steve Pagan,
    Richard Bradshaw, Robert Lepage, Daniel Poliquin, Nellie McClung, Alexa Macdonaugh, Svend Robinson, Paul Watson, Adrienne Clarkson, Mary Walsh,
    the comedien from St. John’s,, Stuart McLean, Donovan Bailey, Jean Drapeau, Jean Chrêtien — désolé monsieur! — Michaël Jean, Sir James Douglas, Lois Houle,
    Bob Rae, Danny Williams, Jean Charest, Isabelle Boulay, Felix Leclerc, Earle Birney, Grey Owl, Bliss Carmen, Natalie McMaster, Les Acadiens, The Mennonite Brethern. Rocket Richard #9, Guy LaFleur, Les Habs, Expo 67,Montréal 76. Calgary 88 — Elizabeth Manley, Toller Cranston, Jeanne Sauve, Felix Antoine Savard (de Chicoutimi) le Musée du Québec et la Musée de civilisationde Québec et la Gallerie national du Canada, La Musée de la Civilisation canadien au Gatineau, Douglas Cardinal, Le Consevatoire Royale de la Music de Toronto, Le Québec Conservatoire, Angèle Dubeau, Louis Hemon, Claude-Henri Grignon, Frank Gehry,
    Terry Fox, Fort Edmonton, Mes Aïeux, La Bolduc, Lois Marshall, tous les enseignants ‘Suzuki’ dans le Canada,
    Chief Dan George, Elizabeth May, Ben Polley, les artistes Inuits, le grand chef des Criis au nord du Québec, les chinois qui ont bâti le chemin de fer à travewrs le Canada et de nos jours sont nos docteurs, ingénieurs, comptables, dentistes, et scientifiques comme Dr. Tak Mak recherche seminale des stem cells à Toronto, John Polyani, Nobel laureate en physique et porte parole pour la paix, Sheila Rogers, Romeo Dallaire, Frank Moriyama, Dr. Nancy Olivieri, Dr. Ricki Schachter, Dr. Lynn From, mes profs dans le department d’ici Stéphanie Nutting, Alain Thomas, Margot Irvine, Joubert Satyre, Martin Perron Dana Paramsakas, Eliane Lousada, Kyeongmi Kim-Bernard, Daniel Chouinard, Denise Mohan, Lee L’clerc, Stephen Henighan. Aussi Emile Nelligan, Jim Corcoran, Therèse Casgrain, Thomas Mulcair, Marc Garneau, Yves Bolduc, Bruno Gerrussi, Adam Giambrone, Marco Marcone Glenn Murray, David Miller et le nouveau maire de Vancouver!

    Plus ou moins, ce sont quelques uns de mes héros canadiens et canadiennes, qui incluent bien des canadiens- québécois comme vous pouvez voir.

    Oui, chus fièr d’être Canadien, par contre avec vos sentiments au contraire — et c’est un chagrin là

    Mais comme un autre Seigneur Dure-cochon vous peut-être pensez que le Canada n’a pas une vraie culture, une vraie histoire, une vraie littérature une vrai place dans le monde parce que le Canada n’est pas un vrai pays!

    C’est dommage Antonio. Êtes-vous digne d’être entre ces autres Canadiens? Parlez moi de votre propre list de héros et expliquez encore une fois pourquoi Canada ne mérite votre admiration.

    Ben oui, vous avez le droit, mais c’est un peu plat, je trouve. Endlessly tiresome. Mais je respect le droit.

    Creusez la tête pour toute l’étérnité, s’il en vous fait plasir pour chercher la crise qui peux faciliter le rupture que vous vous attendez si implacablement.

    Parce que le problème qui empêche le plus ce Québec de nos jours de réalser des exploits plus glorieux que jamais avant, ce n’est pas le Canada!

    C’est l’attitude bien défaitiste de gens négatifs qui remouent toujours contre des efforts co-operatifs, qui agitent sans cesse pour une souverainté qui ne résoudront pas du tout les problèmes ou les tensions au Québec sauf pour une victoire brève et pyrrhique. Avec tous les jérémiades et leurs pleurnicheries que “le Canada n’est pas un pays juste”, et Québec ne peut pas s’échapper du colonialisme Canadien.

    Que de l’absurdité!

    C’est bien pathétique, ce syndrome de rester toujours dans cet espace mental d’être victimisé par ces autres Canadiens (lire ici les autres Québécois fédéralists/nationalists/ mais pas souvrainists, ces autres Québécois plus sains et plus occupés en vivant une vie heureuse dans leur patrie française et leur pays Canada. Ceux qui n’ont pas l’envie de s’en aller la voie des pleurnicheurs.

    Chus juste curieux, qui sont vos héros?

    Avez vous un bon list, parce que je suis prêt d’apprendre plus.

    Merci.

    Les gens disent que les péchés des pères sont visités aux enfants. On va voir.

    Bonne nuit à vous en tout cas.

    bruce

    February 7, 2009 at 5:54 am

  12. Bruce, est-tu capable de concevoir qu’un peuple puisse aspirer a avoir son propre pays, pour en gerer la culture et le developpement economique.Ce n’est pas contre le Canada mais c’est pour nous. Il ya de nombreux peuples dans le monde qui aspirent au statut d’etat-nation, ca n’a rien de nouveau. Aussi, arrete de sur-emotiver la situation, on vit nos oppositions politiques tres smooths et tres diplomatiquement au quebec: par exemple, je ne crois pas qu’en vingt ans, la situation linguistique n’ait cree une seule bagarre.
    Nous avons nos reves hors du Canada, sans accuser le Canada de tous les maux.

    midnightjack

    February 7, 2009 at 7:21 am

  13. JacquesdeMinuit,

    Je viens de critiquer un peu sévèrement Antonio, mais avec toi je sais que tu es un homme bien plus doux et gentil que lui.

    Donc, je voudrais te répondre poliment:

    >ils sont contre le fait qu’on ne reconnaisse pas que >le francais est la langue commune au Quebec, comme >l’anglais est la langue commune au Canada. Parler >plusieurs langues est une richesse mais ca n’a rien a >voir..faut pas tout melanger..

    Bon! Qui est ce “On”?

    “One” est une bonne façon en anglais pour se cacher la conception “des autres, anonymes, impersonnels, la bureaucratie sans visage même” … One believes that, one distances oneself from the opinion of n’importe qui d’autres etc … On aime souvent le “on” pour éviter le “je”, le “moi” et c’est souvent plus poli!

    Mais aussi “on” représente le plus grand piège dans la domaine de la “belle rhétorique!

    Et “on” ne l’acceptera pas cette fois, cher ami!

    Qui est cet “on” qui
    > ne reconnaisse pas que le francais est la langue commune… Parler plusieurs langues est une richesse mais ca n’a rien a voir..faut pas tout melanger..

    ….FAUT PAS TOUT MÉLANGER?

    Voyons!! Ça marcherait pas à Montréal! Pour toute l’éternité “on” entendra les deux langues dans la ville. Et au même temps dans les mêmes rues et les même magasins. Pour éviter ça, il faut qu'”on” aille au Longueil ou au rive sud mais on devrais pas faire ça. Il faut à la fin qu’ “on” reconnaise que le mélange soit l’ordre du jour, tous les jours.

    Nous habitons dans une village globale, un tour de Babel. Å Toronto un bon moietié des conversations “on” entend dans la rue, l’autobus, les magasins, les places publiques sont dans les autres langues, soit chinois, soit italien, soit urdu, soit français soit farsi, soit somali, soit yiddish, soit espagnol, soit portuguès soit quoiqu’il soit! Et c’est tellement bon de tour de Babel ….”on” bla bla bla et c’est de la communication!

    (Comme j’adore le subjonctif,qui n’exist presque pas en anglais!)

    Si “on” a l’envie d’echapper, la chose dont je te recommande, c’est d’aller au campagne, au Muskoka icitte ou Monteregie etc. où tu habites pour des petits séjours si charmants. St. Polycarpe, Ste Zotique, St Jean sur Richelieu, Salaberry, peut-être Kamouraska, Tadoussac … les baleines!!!

    Ne t’inquiète pas, JacquesdeMinuit, la langue français survivra un autre quatre cents ans au Québec toute meilleure que jamais avant… si la planete des homme survivait….

    Avec amitié

    Bruce.

    Aie-tu un bon ‘tit déjeuner et une bonne journée!

    bruce

    February 7, 2009 at 7:28 am

  14. Bruce, j’adore entendre parler d’autres langues sur la rue, c’est le propre des grandes villes et je dirais meme que je suis content qu’ily ait plus d’anglophones sur le plateau mais encore une fois ce n’est pas la question: le question est que parmi touss ces langues parlees dans mon quartier( francais, anglais, portuguais, espagnol, arabe, vietnamien et j’en oublie, une seule peut etre la langue commune de communication: je ne suis pas interesse a vivre dans un endroit totalement francophone, j’aime les mixs, mais encore une fois ca n’a pas rapport

    midnightjack

    February 7, 2009 at 7:35 am

  15. En fait je travaille de nuit, d’ou mon nom, alors je vais bientot aller dormir….je te souhaite une bonne journee..

    midnightjack

    February 7, 2009 at 7:37 am

  16. jacques de minuit,

    Chus pas capable de répondre dans une manière intelligente parce que cette vision minoritaire au Québec est contre les voeux le majorité des Québecois qui ne sont pas alienés dans leurs esprits comme les souvrainistes.

    Je veux pas concevoir d’un Canada sans Québec.

    Si les gens de ta province feront un Oui de 55% ou 60% ou plus (je ne sais pas comment le parliament regarderait les nombres, parce que pour changer la méthode de voter il faut gagner 60%, et si le vote de quitte le Canada est basée sur une question clair,
    il n’ y aurait pas autre choix pour nous “autres” Canadiens. If faut qu'”on” les laisse faire quitter le pays.

    Mais pour avoir ton pays personnel, avec l’exclusion de nous autres Canadiens il faut qu’on détruisse le nôtre qui est en réalité aussi le tien.

    Et comment tu propose d’excluder les anglophones de Montréal? Par leur niant le citoyenté si ils ne peuvent pas passer l’examen de compétance linguistique que'”on”
    (par exemple, Pauline) avait déjà proposé?

    Et sans le citoyeneté il serait le même chose que le lavage éthnique dans les Balkans. Il serait plutIot comme l’expulsion des Acadiens en 1755.

    Deux fautes ne font pas un chose correcte et vraie.

    Avec le balkanisation du monde il serait plus facile pour Amérique ou Chine ou les deux de dominer et exploiter tous les autres pays, incluant Québec.

    C’est le même chose on voit dans la Costa Rica actuelle, indépendant pour environs 180 ans mais contrôle presque totalement en sa culture commerciale et dévelopement économique par les États-unis,

    Et Costa Rica est le plus démocratique et progrésive des pays centroamérican.

    Je voudrais voir une plus fort fédération avec les nations unies, qu’un dévolution progréssive de “Balkanisation” ou les états peu peuplés seront la proie des grands états tout puissant.

    En tout cas c’est pas à moi a décider le futur. J’ai le ballot d’un seule homme et jamais le bal.

    Mais je pense, la séparation soit egoïste est pas si bon que tu puisse imaginer. Un état basé sur un contrôle linguistique que deviendra de plus en plus rigide, et les immigrants continueront d’être la classe défavorisé. Qui sait que font les anglos leur dos contre un mur très dur? La justice poètique peut-être, quoi qu’il soit.

    Mes dans mes yeux cette une vision petite, isolationiste, et surtout quelquechose, à la fin, en effet de la xénophobie. C’est seulement un tribu qui veut se renfermer, au fond.

    bruce

    February 7, 2009 at 8:34 am

  17. Jacques,

    Beaucoup d’erreurs je rends compte. Desolé. J’ai passee la nuit pour comminiquer avec toi, et maintenant je dois aller travailler pour 12 heures, mais c’est ma propre faute.

    Chus heureux que tu est si libéral vers les ‘autres’ au quartier Plateau, mais l’anglais va détériorer énormément à Montréal après la séparation. Tu vas cassé l’esprit anglais dans ta ville, peut-être comme il faut.

    Leurs pères ont fait des péchés, c’est certain.

    Ils garderaient leurs paroles chez leurs foyers, et la population va diminuer de plus en plus, encore probablement comme il faut. Leurs visages pas animés au futur, mais “on” pourrait se déplacer, et démenager pour autre part quand l’isolation monte.

    Bonne revanche, ils auront eu un bonne vie pour deux cents ans en tout cas. Pas grand chose.

    bruce

    February 7, 2009 at 8:51 am

  18. fast eddy,

    “Then perhaps the level of municipality is even better! Let’s do away with Quebec and create a federal republic of townships. Return to the good old days of city-states.”

    If it works better in that way, why not? Jane Jacobs, a famous urbanist who just died basically argued for this as the reason for the independence of Quebec; namely that Montreal would become a prosperous city-state. Furthermore, it would become a more efficient economic engine for the rest of Quebec. Otherwise, according to her, Montreal would be doomed to become a satellite of Toronto. She wrote the book called A Question of Separation, in 1981, and still held the same opinion on the subject when she died a few years ago.

    “I would turn your argument on its head: Anything that is best done by the collective (health insurance, defense, trade, funding of research, bank regulation) is done better by a larger collective than by the smaller group. You spread the risk more uniformly and draw from a larger pool of funds so that the most talented individuals can compete for more resources than would otherwise be available to them in a small group.”

    You could be right. However, there are limits, and there are not just fiscal arguments for the independence of Quebec but also social and cultural arguments that I have expressed elsewhere.

    Antonio

    February 7, 2009 at 9:28 am

  19. johnnyononline

    “it is not only quebec that finds the dynamic leaves a bad taste in the mouth. quebec is the loudest voice among many. quebec leads in this regard. alberta watches and listens closely. the west’s toes have been stepped on by ottawa a number of times too.”

    Ok, but are Alberta and Quebec succeeding in forcing the federal government to respect the competences of the provinces? Do you think it would ever happen?

    I don’t think so, so that is why Alberta and Quebec should be independent if they wish to manage their own affairs.

    Antonio

    February 7, 2009 at 9:34 am

  20. Bruce,

    If you are going to repeat ad nauseam about sovereignists being isolationists, xenophobes bla bla when I and others have already presented evidence to the contrary, I refuse to discuss further with you. You are a federalist shill that is incapable of arguing rationally and honestly about the subject of Canada.

    With that said, I do want to comment on this:

    “Et comment tu propose d’excluder les anglophones de Montréal? Par leur niant le citoyenté si ils ne peuvent pas passer l’examen de compétance linguistique que’”on”
    (par exemple, Pauline) avait déjà proposé?”

    and what is wrong with that? Quebec is (or should be) a French-speaking society. This is a nice way to ensure that all Quebecers have a knowledge of French. This is a recipe for a healthy society where everyone knows the language of society and hence can participate further into it. This is the opposite of exclusion. Many Western countries have things like that; even the liberal Dutch has recently passed legislation requiring all immigrants to learn Dutch and Dutch culture.

    Antonio

    February 7, 2009 at 9:51 am

  21. “Milch cow” — looks like the anus is strategically positioned over Newfoundland

    fast eddy

    February 7, 2009 at 10:37 am

  22. I favor a government that uses incentives and competition to benefit advance society at large, and which reserves punitive or restrictive measures for behavior at the fringes that hurts its citizens.

    Cultural and social issues mainly belong in the former category (incentives) and are best served by a large common pool of funds and allocations. Criminal matters, on the other hand, are best settled within the local community and not by some faceless bureaucracy miles away.

    Creating a new nation by carving up an old nation imperils the quality and range of benefits that derive from central incentives, but does provide the benefit of allowing local matters to be decided locally.

    I respect (but don’t adopt) the enthusiasm for local rule and outward expression of national identity expressed by some. Though I hate nationalism (it is a form of chauvinism through which the mediocre can claim greatness by association with others with whom they share little more than an address), I too get excited when my nation wins medals at the Olympics. It is irrational but irresistible. However in such matters smaller is not better — I doubt that the average American or Russian is a better athlete than the average Canadian, yet their athletes consistently take home more medals than Canada’s for obvious reasons.

    The other motivation for independence comes from a sense of injustice or inequality. This resonates better with me, but a place like Canada seems highly open to undergoing change from within favoring equality and social justice. Bruce, perhaps the sense of indignation and frustration that Canadians seem to feel when the Governor General invokes the right of Queen Elizabeth to shut down your government is a taste of how Quebeckers feel within a Canada that is not their enemy, but neither is it made up of their peers.

    fast eddy

    February 7, 2009 at 11:03 am

  23. “Chus heureux que tu est si libéral vers les ‘autres’ au quartier Plateau, mais l’anglais va détériorer énormément à Montréal après la séparation. Tu vas cassé l’esprit anglais dans ta ville, peut-être comme il faut.”

    I take a different view. I think English may ultimately fare better in an independent Quebec. There will no longer be any reason to suppress English here since French will be the default in all things. Anglos will be treated like Italians or Portuguese and not like the local symbols of Ottawa and Toronto.

    Some important icons will nonetheless falter in the short term and may suffer irreparable blows: McGill University, the independent town of Westmount, etc. (eggs in the omelette, I guess).

    fast eddy

    February 7, 2009 at 11:26 am

  24. “Some important icons will nonetheless falter in the short term and may suffer irreparable blows: McGill University, the independent town of Westmount, etc. (eggs in the omelette, I guess).”

    Anything english would cease to exist should there be no checks and balances as are now in place. Huge exodus again and Quebec’s economy wold suffer, yet again as in 1995, where the economy has never fully recovered.

    That being said, if they get a clear majority of people wanting to leave, then they should separate as we do live in a democracy. Note I said separate and none of this watered down sovereingty associaton arrangement a lot of people talk about.

    ABP

    abp

    February 7, 2009 at 11:43 am

  25. “Anything english would cease to exist should there be no checks and balances as are now in place. Huge exodus again and Quebec’s economy wold suffer, yet again as in 1995, where the economy has never fully recovered.”

    Yes to the economic toll, but less severe than in 1995 precisely because the economy has not yet fully recovered. The banks have already left and never came back.

    But I don’t see why English in Quebec would suffer any more than French has in Canada? It has a small but dedicated constituency and a critical mass for self-sustenance. Consider that 11% of Montrealers consider Italian their first language — it would be even easier for English, given N. American cultural influences.

    fast eddy

    February 7, 2009 at 1:26 pm

  26. antonio @9:51 am

    “Ok, but are Alberta and Quebec succeeding in forcing the federal government to respect the competences of the provinces? Do you think it would ever happen?”

    yes. it is happening now. slowly but surely. this is how canada has survived – it has adapted.

    quebec and the west have outgrown the dynamic and the resulting stress is producing the conditions to enable change.

    it always takes waaaay too long for anyone who knows about it and who is passionate about the changes. the wierd part about it is that – the efforts of the secessionist movement will improve the “idea” of canada and make it stronger – without breaking it.

    alberta, saskatchewan and bc will pay and help make these changes because they are tired of paying. after the changes – canada will appear to be the same place to somebody from south america or asia – but it will not be the same place that you or i or our children know.

    this is why you could consider voting for conservative ideas that come from the west.

    johnnyonline

    February 7, 2009 at 2:09 pm

  27. “But I don’t see why English in Quebec would suffer any more than French has in Canada?”

    Doesn’t matter. It may be a travesty (in my opinion anyway), but no one with any power in this debate really cares about what happens to French/francophones in (the rest of) Canada.

    Acajack

    February 7, 2009 at 3:00 pm

  28. “Doesn’t matter. It may be a travesty (in my opinion anyway), but no one with any power in this debate really cares about what happens to French/francophones in (the rest of) Canada.”‘

    Unfortunately you are likely right. Of course, what ,if anything been done with any determination to support, german, hispanic, ukrainian, chinese etc etc cultures which actually outnumber those of french heritage in many parts of the ROC.

    abp

    February 7, 2009 at 3:22 pm

  29. “But I don’t see why English in Quebec would suffer any more than French has in Canada? It has a small but dedicated constituency and a critical mass for self-sustenance. Consider that 11% of Montrealers consider Italian their first language — it would be even easier for English, given N. American cultural influences”

    You are not taking into consideration that a large number of anglos would chose to leave the province if separation were to happen. This would weaken the english influence greatly and this critical mass you speak of would most likely disappear. History tells us what happened prior to 95. At the end of the day, after they left, property values would likely go down and the economy would suffer creating a backlash against anything anglo who would be the scapegoats for any negative cause and effect.

    abp

    February 7, 2009 at 3:27 pm

  30. “I take a different view. I think English may ultimately fare better in an independent Quebec. There will no longer be any reason to suppress English here since French will be the default in all things. Anglos will be treated like Italians or Portuguese and not like the local symbols of Ottawa and Toronto”

    Less resentment of English perhaps, but less local relevance as well. It’s very likely that the situation of English post-independence wouldn’t resemble anything similar to what today’s Quebec anglos are accustomed to (*precisely*! – it would be more like being treated like Italians or Portuguese, which is a long from what anglos in Quebec have at the moment).

    Acajack

    February 7, 2009 at 3:51 pm


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: